Five daffodils to grow

Posted: Monday 23 September 2013
by James Alexander-Sinclair

...here are my five favourite daffodils - at the moment. I do, of course, reserve the right to change my mind at a moment’s notice.


I am sitting here worrying about bulbs.

I fully appreciate that there are lots of other things in the world to worry about, but at the moment for me it is lumpy brown things. I am trying to sort out my bulb order for this autumn. No doubt many of you are doing the same thing (although the more efficient among you will have done so weeks ago).

My problem is that I am ordering for a whole load of clients and I usually end up with about 20,000 bulbs lying around my barn in need of sorting. As my youngest child has just gone to university I no longer have anybody at home who can be press-ganged into (generally unenthusiastic) service.

Tulips can at least wait to be planted until November but daffodils need to go in the ground pretty soon. I thought a list might be quite interesting, so here are my five favourite daffodils - at the moment. I do, of course, reserve the right to change my mind at a moment’s notice.

Narcissus ‘Actaea’: This a really lovely daffodil. Pale coloured and with a red and orange centre. It is also much later to flower.

Narcissus lobularis: the native daffodil. Small (only about six inches high) with a downward facing tubular flower. Great planted en masse in grass, or under shrubs.

Narcissus ‘Paper White’: a breathtakingly scented flower but needs to be grown inside. Best to force them into flower early.

Narcissus ‘Mount Hood’: pure white trumpet. Grows to about 40cm and is excellent naturalised in long grass.

Narcissus ‘Golden Harvest’: possibly the best straightforward, conventional daffodil. Very yellow and unashamedly springlike. About 40cm tall and flowering in April.

Narcissus ‘Yellow Cheerfulness’: many small heads of double petalled flowers. Deliciously scented.

Did I say Top Five? I meant six and could go on for ages but you probably have other things to do...





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