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27/04/2012 at 16:05

My baby tomato plants have grown to about 4inches tall and then are wilting and dying, I don't know what I'm doing wrong. They are a basket variety  Maskotka. I am also growing sungold and gardeners delight which seem to be ok at the moment.

27/04/2012 at 16:08

Is there any chance that they are too wet? Seedlings like to be moist, but not wet.

Where are you keeping them? Baby tomatoes need reasonably mild temperatures.

27/04/2012 at 16:16
samshoward wrote (see)

My baby tomato plants have grown to about 4inches tall and then are wilting and dying, I don't know what I'm doing wrong. They are a basket variety  Maskotka. I am also growing sungold and gardeners delight which seem to be ok at the moment.

Where are they? -if they are outside- too cold and wet.

27/04/2012 at 16:19

they are in my hall near a window so they are not too cold, I didn't think they were too wet but I will hold off on the watering and hopefuly save the rest of them, I am watering them the same as the other varieties but maybe they don't need so much.

27/04/2012 at 16:24

So still inside then-that is good.

Are they in individual pots?

What sort of compost?

27/04/2012 at 18:21

they are in individual pots and just a general purpose compost.

27/04/2012 at 18:25

Then you seem to be doing everything right- did you bury the stems deeper in the pots up to the seed leaves?

28/04/2012 at 10:15

Yes I did that aswell so maybe it is just the watering that I need to adjust. Thanks for your help.

29/04/2012 at 13:58

hello im a newbiebut have you feed them with tomorite  ive got baby plants andi feed them once a week

29/04/2012 at 14:00

Do not feed tomatoes with anything until the first truss has set-you are just promoting leafy growth at the expense of flowers.

29/04/2012 at 17:47
samshoward wrote (see)

they are in my hall near a window so they are not too cold, I didn't think they were too wet but I will hold off on the watering and hopefuly save the rest of them, I am watering them the same as the other varieties but maybe they don't need so much.

Toms' water requirements don't vary according to varieties. It's always best to let the mix dry out completely between waterings. It won't hurt baby toms in the slightest; in fact, it will do them good. They shouldn't be pampered.

If the strugglers and the ones that are fine have identical conditions, the ones that are struggling might well have suffered a setback of some sort earlier in their short lives.

29/04/2012 at 17:49

And geoff is right. Baby plants shouldn't be fed. Let them develop their strength unaided.

10/05/2012 at 15:01

hi ive just bought tomato plants and when l got them home l noticed a brown mottling on some of leaves are they ok or do l need to treat them or buy new please 

10/05/2012 at 18:13

Can you give us a little more detail on the mottling? Are there identifiable spots? More detail will give us a better clue.

10/05/2012 at 18:48

I always plant 'French Marigilds' in the vicinity of my tomato plants, they deter white-fly and other infections.

10/05/2012 at 18:50

 I intended to say "French MARIGOLDS.

10/05/2012 at 19:46
This is my first year growing tomatoes in my unheated greenhouse. I'm using growpots and I wondering how much watering I should apply should the compost be kept constantly moist or should the the surface of the compost be allowed to dry out between waterings.
10/05/2012 at 21:42

I had a dismal crop last year of tomatoes last year, so this year I am trying Sub Arctic Plenty. I have them in a poly tunnel under fleece and they are romping away. The Super Maramande are having a grand sulk. Unseasonally cold here in Edinburgh.

11/05/2012 at 06:54
PETER LEWIS wrote (see)
This is my first year growing tomatoes in my unheated greenhouse. I'm using growpots and I wondering how much watering I should apply should the compost be kept constantly moist or should the the surface of the compost be allowed to dry out between waterings.

Peter, better to let the mix dry out between waterings, by which I mean dry out pretty completely. Very very few plants like damp feet and toms aren't one of the very very few. How big are your pots? Poke a finger down deep into the mix to test for moisture. If it's dry down to the depth of your finger - subject to the size of the pot - water.

As I've posted elsewhere here, toms are very sturdy critters that will produce much better for you if they're treated with - for want of a better term - controlled neglect. Pampered toms - over-watered and over-fed - will never achieve their maximum potential.

As an example, I grow them outdoors here in Tuscany. The summer temps can sit in the 40s for weeks on end. In those conditions, I water infrequently - about once a week at most - but very deeply. They produce tons of fruit.

Now obviously toms in pots have different requirements simply for the very contained space in which the roots live. They can't burrow down in search of moisture. But the same general rule of thumb applies - make their lives too easy and comfy and they won't give of their best.

11/05/2012 at 07:03
Gaffelbiter wrote (see)

I had a dismal crop last year of tomatoes last year, so this year I am trying Sub Arctic Plenty. I have them in a poly tunnel under fleece and they are romping away. The Super Maramande are having a grand sulk. Unseasonally cold here in Edinburgh.

Yes, Sub Arctic Plenty is one of the earliest maturing toms created for very short growing seasons. Stupice, a Czech variety, is another. I grew Stupice once just out of interest. The short period to maturity makes for a shortage of flavour, unfortunately, but they're better than no tomatoes at all in places with very short growing seasons.

Marmande is a nice tom. Hopefully Edinburgh's weather will warm up!

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