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19/07/2013 at 11:47

This is the first time I have grown these, the plants are doing wonderful with masses of flowers but they all appear to be male, (I bought what I thought was self polinating-I have grown them from seed).

I have tried polinating by hand but what fruit I get just turns yelow and drops off.

i have watered and fed as needed but to no avail.Can anyone help ne please

19/07/2013 at 14:51

The first flowers often are male for some reason. Then the plant produces some female flowers but, of course, by that time the male flowers are dead. You wait a bit longer and more males appear but then the female ones have given up hope of finding prince charming..... And on it goes until the frost when you pull the whole lot up and remind yourself not to bother with that caper next year.

19/07/2013 at 15:20

You could try tapping the pollen between the 2.

I just leave them to get on with it (sex) and always have a decent crop. The ones that go yellow are unfertilised

As an experiment you could cut off a male in its prime and plunge it into a female and see what happens, it may be that pollinaters aren't about.

Sorry all sounds riske but that's life - well courgettes!

19/07/2013 at 16:01

Thank you both for your replies, i not only found it usefull but highly amusing.

Waterbutts:- I will probably go down this route, as cucumbers etc are half price during the summer months anyway!!!, but I can tell you have had lots of experience.

Matty:

I have been out and done as you sugtgested, (hope it wasn't to painfull on the plant), and fingers crossed ---- thanks again (this is my first time on the forum but think I will be on again thanks to your kind replies.

 

19/07/2013 at 17:03

But a polythene wrapped cucumber from the supermarket will never come close to the crispness of one you have just picked yourself.

Most  veg we grow are cheaper from the supermarket if you add up the cost of seed, fertiliser, hair restorer (after you've pulled it out), and labour. Not to mention the cost of soap powder.   We grow our own for the flavour, and the knowledge it is not soaked in pesticide.

19/07/2013 at 19:00

Just think of the fun and satisfaction of growing your own veg. and forget the money cost. My Tomatoes (Unwins - `Gourmet`) are cropping wonderfully and inspite of the early year (March to late April) heating costs of our 6 x 6 ft. GH, the satisfaction is fantastic each year.

Our cougettes this year are a disaster due to the March and April freeze and dryness - we win some and lose some!! Previous years courgettes have been super, but this year "What do you think of it so far?"  

                                          RUBBISH!!!

 

KEF
19/07/2013 at 21:18

Margaret you must grow your own cucumber at some time. If you close your eyes and eat a piece of home grown specially the small lunchbox varieties you would think it was melon...wonderful.

Bigolob, soz about your courgettes, mine are doing brill this year, rubbish last, but still waiting for the first ripe tomato  

20/07/2013 at 11:13

Thankyou all kindly, 

I have in the past grown some of my own veg,(just the basics)but due to an unfortunate accident I am now no longer able to work, so at last I can indulge my passion and have a go growing more varieties that need attention.i only have a small garden now,(micro size so lots of pots and raised beds)but have managed to have a go at the three sisters in a small raised bed and so far they are doing wonderfull,(except the courgettes-hence my concern).

KEF- i have had my first tomato,(delicousl) so there you go,swings and roundabouts hehe,and i will persist with the cucumbers, how could I not with the promise of such delights.Thanks again all.

 

20/07/2013 at 12:26

We'll see, let me know

30/07/2013 at 09:26

I hope you see this Matty:- I have been out this morning and it would appear I have got finally some viable cucumbers and courgette-hooooray, so thank again for your help with this, muchly appreciated.

31/07/2013 at 14:47

Hi Margaret,

Couple of tips that I got from a neighbour which I tried and have worked well!

1) When a male flower appears but there are no female flowers open, I simply store the male flower in the fridge- the pollen will stay alive for about a week or so

2) When a female flower appears, I take the male flower and remove the petals (leaving only the base filament of the flower with the pollen tubes/anther attached). I then place the whole of the male base with the pollen anthers directly into the female flower and very gently push down so I knwo the male pollen will touch the female stigma.

Sounds complicated but it is quite easy in practise!  essentially take the male petals of and then place remains of male flower into female.

Hope this works for you!

31/07/2013 at 19:33

Hi,

Compared with last year my courgettes are fruiting well this year. (See Photo),

My question is, is the amount of foliage I have normal? this pic is from 1 week ago and now the leaves are even taller.

Would the plants benefit from cutting off some leaves and also some of the male flower stems?

In other words: would I have more fruit if I did trim a little.?

 

Thanks

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/28561.jpg?width=300&height=350&mode=max

 

 

01/08/2013 at 07:45

Andrew, it's worth looking at why the extensive foliage. Are you feeding the plants? If you are, and with a nitrogen-rich fertiliser, you'd be encouraging leaf growth at the expense of fruit.

01/08/2013 at 08:57

Thanks crazycat, that is a very useful tip as I have wondered how to do this 

02/08/2013 at 16:59

Italophile

 

Yes, I am using nettle juice. I believe this is very high in nitrogen so it looks like I'm using the wrong feed.

I have some pot ash made from burnt wood and also a tomato feed, which would be the best?

 

Also what is nettle juice best for?

 

Thanks

02/08/2013 at 17:14

Italophile

 

Yes, I am using nettle juice. I believe this is very high in nitrogen so it looks like I'm using the wrong feed.

I have some pot ash made from burnt wood and also a tomato feed, which would be the best?

 

Thanks

02/08/2013 at 17:38
Italophile wrote (see)

Andrew, it's worth looking at why the extensive foliage. Are you feeding the plants? If you are, and with a nitrogen-rich fertiliser, you'd be encouraging leaf growth at the expense of fruit.

Oh dear! I have given them 2 soakings with nettle liquid fertiliser (also tomatos and pumpkins!)

Would a potash feed be better (made from bonfire wood) or a tomato feed?

I suppose nettle liquid would be best on brassicas then?

 

Thanks

02/08/2013 at 21:15

hello i have been very lucky with my courgette plants we have had abundance of courgette there growing faster then we can eat them but my cucumbers are failing to flower but then the heads drop off there in the greenhouse so i dont know why we dont normaly have a problem any tips

02/08/2013 at 22:48

Hi Margaret7

just seen your post. Yes!! Success!!

Hope you have lots.

 

I just use general vegetable feed, don't know its ins and outs but seems to work. have used tomato liquid feed as well

03/08/2013 at 12:18

Thanks Matty, and as my grandson is visiting today for a couple of weeks, he too will thank you as these are his favourites.He is only 10 and loves pottering around the garden with me, and after having three sons who have shown no interest- this is a pure delight for me.

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