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14 messages
02/01/2014 at 20:14

Looking through the seed catalogue that arrived today I was attracted to growing physalis this year - I think it is also called cape gooseberry.

Has anyone attempted growing this fruit and found any pitfalls?  I don't have a greenhouse so is it possible to grow outside in my allotment?

02/01/2014 at 20:23

I was given 3 plants last year. the fruits fell off every time they they nearly got ripe. It may not have been the plants' fault

I wouldn't have grown them if I hadn't been given them, I don't like them much

02/01/2014 at 20:28

That doesn't sound too good Nut - Perhaps they got bad vibes off you as you don't like them very much.  I'll wait to see if anyone else has grown them first before ditching the idea.  Thanks.

02/01/2014 at 20:30

 They may indeed have got the bad vibes Forester. I may give them off strongly at times. Ask any houseplant

02/01/2014 at 22:00

I have had a few that come with collections of "free" perennials.  I have killed them every time - even though the rest of the collection has come through.  Maybe if I'd bought a plant they would have been more successful.  Don't think I am giving off bad vibes ...... but on the other hand ......

03/01/2014 at 08:59

They like a hot summer to ripen properly. My daughter grew them and they were quite vigorous but she lives in south west France.

07/01/2014 at 10:11

I've not had too much luck with them but the stock i got was from a pound shop so that might be why, I've seen them growing in the Black Swan art center quadrangle in the middle of Newcastle upon Tyne, they seem to like it there and look really amazing on mass. Perhaps it is the reflected heat from the large sand stones around them the brick wall behind or the fact that they back onto a pottery studio and the kiln might kick out the heat and help the cause.

07/01/2014 at 10:42

I too have grown Physalis in France where they did wonderfully well.  Grew them last year in the UK ( from seed) and they produced a lot of fruit.  Having said that, the good summer no doubt helped to ripen the majority.  They can grow to large plants so take up quite a lot of space which could probably be put to better use - particularly in this climate.

07/01/2014 at 18:24

Thanks for all your replies.  I'm getting the impression that without a guaranteed hot summer it probably won't be worth the effort. 

11/01/2014 at 18:20

We'll to be fair we grew some last year ( South coast of England) the seeds were bought the year before from a garden centre when they sell off the seasons seeds for 50p so many germinated, I took some to the allotment, it does tend to be dry there and did not do well but we also put some in a large pot and grew them in the garden and they seemed to be fine, had quite a few fruits that my wife enjoyed, seeds were started in the greenhouse, don't give up! They don't take up much room or space and it's always worth trying

12/01/2014 at 17:47

I grow Physalis franchetti Gnome on a north facing wall (our house!) in East Anglia and it has the red fruits. It is better to get a plant and not seed, because it can take a number of years to reach fruit bearing age.

Gnome is one of the varieties that is shorter and less invasive than straight Physalis franchetti.

22/01/2014 at 13:07

Just for interest poundland are currently selling physalis Chinese lantern bulbs.

30/01/2014 at 20:53
I have grown Physalis in the green house and the fruit were small but sweet. Last year  I decided to give them a miss as they took up a lot of room in my small green house. However the plants I had thrown out seeded and with the very hot summer we had last year (2013) they grew beside the compost box and fruited too!

 

31/01/2014 at 14:19

I grew them in County Durham, they were quite nice. I grew them in a porch. I grew mine from seed I got from fruit. I bought some seed on line too but never sowed it. I made no effort with the seed other than pick it out of my teeth first.

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