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7 messages
27/07/2014 at 21:31

Is it possible to save my dried up peas for next year's seed?  If so, will  they come true and should I do anything like put them in the fridge or freezer?

27/07/2014 at 21:44

Yes, just let them dry inside their pods (best left on the plants) and once completely dry just put them in a paper bag and store somewhere cool-ish (like a drawer in a shed.)  If others around you are also growing peas then they might not all come true, but most will.

27/07/2014 at 21:52

Thank you for the prompt response. It sounds very easy, which is good 'cos I make loads of mistakes. Must remember to write what they are on thebag!

27/07/2014 at 22:01

Hi, Outdoor girl

Just something you may wish to consider.

Make sure you only save seed from open-pollinated varieties and not F1 hybrids.

Open pollinated vegetable varieties are often heirloom varieties that have naturally evolved over the years and been passed down through generations of gardeners. The vegetables produced from the seeds are similar to the produce of the parent plant and gradually evolve to cope with local conditions such as moisture levels and high or low temperatures.

F1 hybrid varieties are commercially produced seeds that combine certain traits of two parent plants such as resistance to disease, pests or bolting and a tendency to produce heavy yields and do not reproduce to type.

28/07/2014 at 09:00

Oh dear, I don't know what they are. I bought them at a seed day in January. They were in a brown envelope. I think they are called  'Perfection'.

28/07/2014 at 09:09

Not sure about those, OG....I would go ahead anyway, even if they don't return to type, they'll not be a complete failure.

28/07/2014 at 09:24

I don't think it'll matter if you forget to label the bag, as unless someone can correct me only pea seeds look like pea seeds. Sweet pea seeds look different

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