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6 messages
24/10/2013 at 22:30

I want to re-start my strawberry bed. It has been going for 5 years and has become rather overgrown with weeds and random runners. My question is am I better off buying pot grown plants to put in this weekend or shall I get bare rooted runners as seen advertised on the web ?

Many thanks in anticipation.

24/10/2013 at 23:02

Firstly if it were me i'd move to fresh ground. Time to practice a bit of crop rotation and leave the pests and deseases behind.

Could you not use young runners from your old bed?

Never had anything to do with bare rooted runners bought in so can't help you there but pot grown ones will be fine but relatively pricey.

Hope this is of some help.

25/10/2013 at 09:40

Hi Ivyhouse, I agree with No Expert in that you should start a new bed somewhere else.  If you dig up your current bed, save some runners and plant in the new bed.  I now have two very large beds.  The first was planted with bought bare rooted runners and the second was populated by the offspring of the first lot. 

First bed had its second summer this year and managed to produced at least 3-4lbs of fruit every other day.  Second bed is only in its first year this year - am expecting great things (weather dependant) next year.

27/10/2013 at 10:00

i  was thinking of gigging up my strawbs and replanting in the same place but with a polythene covering to prevent weeds. I don't really have anywhere else suitable to move them to. is this ok to do? This was the first summer in our new house and garden an we had about 1-2 pounds of strawbs every day, but the amount of weeds are uncontrollable so that's why trying the polythene method as used by commercial growers

27/10/2013 at 11:16

Just completed my first 2 years as an Allotmenteer so of course I am now an Expert in All Things Lottie !

I inherited a patch of rough ground with just strawberries so I put them all in one 14 x 4 foot bed and got loads in both summers

Tried it with a fleece and then a lot of straw which worked best

Some experts say the plants are only good for 2 years and then replace or use their runners

I think that the suggestion by NE & SF is a good one as the plants must have taken some of the nutrients from the soil and its difficult to dig / hoe / manure with permanent plants in situ

Got this quote from a National Institutions site

"Strawberry plants can produce fruit for five or six years. However, after the first two years the yields will be reduced dramatically and a build-up of pests and diseases can occur. Strawberry beds are usually kept for two or three years before they're cleared and planted on new ground."

I think I will dig up and rotate which sounds like a West Country dance.

Good luck Ivyhouse and let us know how you get on

 

27/10/2013 at 12:58

The basis for successful veg growing is crop rotation. If you continue to plant the same crop inthe same position then it becomes more prone to disease. Tris Harder sounds as if the strawberries were there before you. Then tou don't know how old they are or maybe I've taken you up wrong. there must be a small area you could rotate to for 3 years and then come back again to this area.

Use black polythene or any weed supressant fabric by all means as it protects the fruit from the soil, keeps down weeds and removes the need for strow which can become soggy ans can harbour mildew and other issues.

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