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11 messages
30/09/2013 at 11:44

Can anyone give me some advise on tomato fungus attack. My moneymakers have had a lousy year. First they succumbed to blossom end rot even though they were watered regularly and evenly. Then the fruit that survived started dropping off because there was mould/fungus on the stalk end of the tomato.

Is there a more disease resistant strain with the same cropping abundance as moneymaker or what should I do to deter the diseases next year.

30/09/2013 at 12:34

My initial thoughts are that maybe the atmosphere's been too damp - can you tell us more about how you grew these please?

 

30/09/2013 at 12:49

I grerw them from seed starting off about the beginning of April. Transferred to 3 inch pots early May then into the greenhouse in bottomless pots sitting on growbags.

I sprayed once when they were about 2 ft high with an fungicide. The early fruit grew flattened with the black patch on the blossom end.

Hope this helps

30/09/2013 at 12:51

PS door and  roof vents always open during this hot summer

30/09/2013 at 12:52

Watering regime?

30/09/2013 at 14:05

I grew Moneymaker again this year and have had a nice crop from them - still have a dozen or two to ripen. I took a lot of foliage off mine - outside in a growhouse - and kept them fairly dry. They were in large pots. Sometimes overcrowding causes an issue as it's perfect for fungal problems. Could they have been a bit too close together rocketman?

30/09/2013 at 14:12
Fairygirl wrote (see).... I took a lot of foliage off mine - outside in a growhouse - and kept them fairly dry. ....

Think this is important FG - I don't water my tomatoes until they're beginning to flag - I was really strict with myself about it this year, even in the higher temps we've had, and have been rewarded with not even a spot of anything fungal/bacterial.

30/09/2013 at 14:52

Thnx for this. Maybe I had them too close together. I watered them evering evening - about two pints per plant. I did this because I understood if they flopped that would cause blossom end rot.

As a precaution I intend to spray the whole greenhouse with Jeyes fluid in the early spring

30/09/2013 at 15:18

I was growing great big beefsteak and oxhearts as well as other varieties outside in big pots on a southfacing terrace.  They were watered twice a week at the most.

The pots had a gap of about 6" at the top and when I watered I filled that gap with water making sure nothing splashed onto the leaves.  That's the most they ever had.

It's consistency that counts when avoiding BER.  I was consistently mean to them.  

I fed them twice - once when the second truss was beginning to set and once again 6 weeks later.  That's all.  Grow them hard and they'll be keen to reproduce - it's a survival strategy. 

I had BER on two individual tomatoes on the same vine on a variety notorious for BER.

 

30/09/2013 at 17:29

No fungal probs on any of mine either. When I grew them at last house they were in the conservatory- it was big ( over 20' long) and south facing and very hard to keep the temp manageable. I only had 6 plants (Moneymaker) spaced out in there along the sill and we had a great crop from them with no disease. Growing them a bit 'hard' seems to be the key.

01/10/2013 at 10:05
rocketman wrote (see)

Thnx for this. Maybe I had them too close together. I watered them evering evening - about two pints per plant. I did this because I understood if they flopped that would cause blossom end rot.

As a precaution I intend to spray the whole greenhouse with Jeyes fluid in the early spring

rocketman, if it was Blossom End Rot, it's caused by plant stress. The plant, stressed, is unable to distribute sufficient calcium via its internal mechanisms to the fruit.

Planting too close together won't trigger BER. It's more likely to create a climate for fungal problems with a lack of air circulation.

It's often said that an irregular watering pattern is the major cause of BER, the irregular pattern stressing the plant. It will certainly cause BER. As can fluctuating temperatures, excessive heat, etc. As can overwatering. I think you were overwatering. I'd follow Dovefromabove's watering pattern posted above. Less is always better with toms, both water and fertiliser. Toms perform at their best when left pretty much to their own devices.

It's hard to know what the problem was at the stem end of the fruit. Have you already disposed of the fruit? Is there a chance of a photo?

 

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