7 messages
06/07/2013 at 10:10

Hi

do I remove any leaves to allow more light to speed up ripening or do I just leave all the leaves on the plant, there appears to be too much foliage which restricts the light.

 

thanks

 

jazzy

06/07/2013 at 12:41

You can remove any leaves below the first truss of tomatoes. Another thing to check would be to see if there are any side shoots growing - they can get big very  quickly - I  have learnt from experience 

Pam LL

KEF
06/07/2013 at 13:04

I wouldn't go removing any leaves at this time of year unless they are diseased. Agree about keeping a check on any side shoots.

06/07/2013 at 13:22

Should you get rid of leaves that grow at the end of a truss? Must admit, had never seen it before but read someone here had it one of their plants and sure enough, one of my Gardeners Delights does...below, truss to the left of the stem in the centre of the pic. 

im pinching out side shoots on mine. Haven't cut off any lower branches as of yet - seems a bit early?

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26860.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

 

 

06/07/2013 at 16:10

Yes, if there is a growing tip appearing on the end of the flower truss, treat it as you would a sideshoot and pinch it off above the last flower.  Certain varieties do this a lot - my black russian and brandywine do it on almost every flower truss. 

06/07/2013 at 16:41

thanks, bob - will do. thought was a g's delight but is a black cherry it's happened on.

07/07/2013 at 13:09
Jazzy2 wrote (see)

Hi

do I remove any leaves to allow more light to speed up ripening or do I just leave all the leaves on the plant, there appears to be too much foliage which restricts the light.

 

thanks

 

jazzy

To answer your first question, it's temperature that ripens toms, not light. It's why toms will ripen inside on the kitchen bench. Optimum temps for ripening are from the low-20s upwards.

You can remove side shoots, and it's a good idea to keep a gap of 12-18" between the soil and the lowest foliage purely for housekeeping purposes. Fungal spores can and will fall from the foliage to the soil beneath and can be splashed back up again during watering. The gap helps against that.

For the same housekeeping reasons, it's also a good idea to avoid clumps of impenetrable foliage. Air circulation is a big help against fungal problems and impenetrable clumps hinder air circulation. You have to be judicious, though. The plant needs foliage for photosynthesis to keep growing and developing.

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