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29/05/2013 at 13:50

i think they are money makers. they are small cherry like tomatoes.

just looking to see how much space each plant needs.

29/05/2013 at 14:10

Moneymakers are an indeterminate variety, wg, meaning they will keep on growing and producing fruit during the season. They can reach 6' or more unless you nip out the growing tips. For indeterminates, as a rule of thumb, the bigger the pot the better to let them reach their full potential.

Given that, you also have to factor in your available space, including access to sunlight for as long as possible during the day, and how many plants you want.

Once you get into pots below 30cm (in diameter) you start to compromise their potential. But, as I say, you are ultimately at the mercy of the available space.

One important thing, though. The plants will need to be staked and tied up to the stakes. Stakes in pots can be a problem if the pot isn't deep enough to give the stake decent stability. A strong wind can tip everything over.

 

29/05/2013 at 17:04

i think i will have to chuck a few plants out!

so deeper than 30cm? do they need to be spaced out any certain distance? i have a big long rectanglar pot so i could put a few in that.

29/05/2013 at 17:46

You wouldn't want a pot shallower than 30cm with a proper stake in it. There's not enough soil to support it.

With toms in general it's a good idea to have as much space between the plants as possible. It aids air circulation which is a help against fungal diseases. Fungal spores love lots of foliage crammed up together. Keeping the air moving keeps the spores moving. As a rule of thumb, 3 feet is about the minimum distance you'd want between plants. More if possible.

29/05/2013 at 21:29

...lots of good information on this thread... I'm afraid I break all those rules Italophile...

30/05/2013 at 00:32

3ft? so in a 6 ft x 4 ft green house you'd grow 4 plants? Yes in an ideal world, we all would have a 3ft spacing, but we actually live in the REAL world, I have a 12' x 10' greenhouse, I grow 12 indeterminates stright down the middle in 14" pots, I then grow cuc's on back wall, and tumbling toms down the sides.. I do have great ventilation, 2 auto louvre, either side, and 4 top windows also auto, I bought and built this way purely for this ventilation, I live on the side of a hill and catch the breeze. Touchwood, never had blight, whitefly or any other problem. My greenhouse is situated in my back garden, far away from veg crops so maybe this helps too?

Italophile, I don't have any fans in my setup, however telling people a spacing of 3 foot or greater is going to freak most newbies out.

30/05/2013 at 07:15

BB, sounds like you've got great ventilation - including that breeze - so that gives you a huge head start.

Yes, around 3' between plantings is the acknowledged preferred minimum. And, yes, it's in an ideal world. Obviously not everyone can achieve it. As I said to windowgardener further up the page, you are ultimately dictated to by your circumstances.

Unless you spray against fungal diseases, air circulation is your best means of minimising the chances of fungal diseases. Plant spacing is only one of the numerous bits of housekeeping you can practise.

Others include keeping the foliage as dry as possible, nipping off excess branches and foliage to avoid impenetrable clumps forming and hindering air circulation, and maintaining a gap between the lowest foliage and the soil. Fungal spores can and will fall from the foliage to the soil and be splashed back up again during watering. The gap helps against this.

Ultimately, the closer you plant the toms together, the more care you need to take.

 

 

30/05/2013 at 07:55

Good to have your advice re tomatoes on the forum Italophile.  Enjoy it and picking up some good tips

30/05/2013 at 08:10

Me too Verd. I don't grow many as I don't have the room here but I've had good success in previous years in a conservatory and a porch. This year is the first time I've grown from seed too and they are coming on really well. The extra info here has been a real benefit. Conditions vary throughout the country too- I wouldn't try having any outside in Scotland without protection!

30/05/2013 at 11:58

I can confess to being a bit of a clean freak too, I religously scrub the inside from top to bottom every spring, my GH is also North South and the back wall is actually not glass, it's attached to the end of my summerhouse. The floor is gravel, perhaps because of the lack of soil (the pea gravel is about 4" thick), I don't have the humid conditions for fungus to enjoy? I do damp the floor down on particularly hot days, but as I say I'm either exceptionally fortunate, or my system is particularly efficient. Many tips on here from you Italophile, I'm sorry if I came across as rude, wasn't intended.

 

30/05/2013 at 16:29

my plants are currently covered by old drinks bottles to try and make a mini greenhouse for them. but now reading about fungal infections im worried that this was a bad idea?

30/05/2013 at 16:35

BB, not in the slightest. It was a fair point. Not everyone grows in an ideal world. I'm lucky that I've been able to for a long time, first in Oz, now in Italy. The drawback in Sydney was the stinking humidity, fungal heaven; here in Italy it's the uninterrupted fortnights of 40C+. It can fry the flowers on the plants. But I count my tomato blessings.

Spacing is only one of the anti-fungal measures, that's all. Part of the package.

Scrubbing out is always a good idea for a lot of reasons. I think it's your ventilation, though, and the breeze in particular, that helps you. But be vigilant, ever vigilant. As I'm sure you are.

30/05/2013 at 16:37

windowgardener, covering them like that is all right on a short-term basis in case of, say, sudden cold snaps. It's not healthy in the longer term for the reason that bothers you. Trapped humid air is the enemy.

30/05/2013 at 17:00

oh noo, i will take their covers off when i get home!

how do i know if i have fungal infections and what would i do??

appreciate all the help!!

 

30/05/2013 at 17:12

The common ones manifest as spots on the leaves that gradually enlarge. I've got a link on my HD somewhere to a good explanation with photos. I'll find it and post it.

05/06/2013 at 00:42
Italophile wrote (see)

BB, not in the slightest. It was a fair point. Not everyone grows in an ideal world. I'm lucky that I've been able to for a long time, first in Oz, now in Italy. The drawback in Sydney was the stinking humidity, fungal heaven; here in Italy it's the uninterrupted fortnights of 40C+. It can fry the flowers on the plants. But I count my tomato blessings.

Spacing is only one of the anti-fungal measures, that's all. Part of the package.

Scrubbing out is always a good idea for a lot of reasons. I think it's your ventilation, though, and the breeze in particular, that helps you. But be vigilant, ever vigilant. As I'm sure you are.

I'm always in the GH pottering, mind with the weather this last few days, it's nearly at the point where you can pass out!! I know what you mean about fortnights of 40, my parents live on Malta, so we get that and usually a breeze. It's hell on the leaves, even with heavy duty shading we finally admitted defeat, we grow to crop now from march - june, and then sep-late october (wind is usually up though). We grow outside, my folks rent a small plot on a field close by, we also grow lettuce and cherry toms on the roof of the apartment block. It's odd getting your head around essentially having 2 growing seasons, and adjusting sowing etc accordingly.

05/06/2013 at 07:09

BB, you know all about growing in the heat then. Not much breeze here when it heats up, unfortunately. Just still, baking heat. The only saving grace is that it's pretty clear heat.

In Sydney, while not usually as hot in terms of numbers, the oppressive humidity was the killer. The saving grace, though, was that I could grow toms for about nine months a year. I used to grow Brandywine Sudduth as a purely autumn crop, after the worst of the humidity had passed. It won't set fruit in heat and humidity.

05/06/2013 at 09:35

I shall now type something that just goes to show, you may stop lots of stuff with great ventilation, but dryness encourages OTHER beasties. I planted a peach to train as a fan on my southern end of the GH last year. Good old thompson & morgan firstly sent me one with very few laterals on the bottom 2 foot of the plant, after I moaned, they refunded me, but I still planted and am attempting to slowly bend the branches down.

Now last year, I grew loads of toms, took a while to ripen but the GH was packed. The peach developed quite a nasty outbreak of red spider, no other plants affected thankfully. This leads me to believe T&M provided me a plant already infested, as if it had come through the ventilation it would have been hitting toms first. I kept spraying the peach with misted water several times a day, then used some form of bug killer after the toms had finished, I then used a pest candle end of the year, then after cleaning the gh this year used another candle. This morning I found webbing on the growing tips, it's back. Just ordered Phytosieulus persimilis, and a follow up for 2 weeks later, hoping this will clear it up.

So just to let all those gardeners out there thinking I'm getting it easy, I'm not!!! RSM is a REAL pain to get rid of, but I shall perservere. I shall put a thread on the problems forum, and TRY to keep it updated with my findings.

05/06/2013 at 10:03

I'm so sorry for you Brummie B, I do hope you manage to get rid of this pest; I'm spraying the G/H with water everytime I walk past as I really don't want it.

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