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13 messages
08/07/2014 at 17:29

Hi Guys, i'm thinking/planning ahead to winter at the moment   and would like some info on winter veg that can be grown in a greenhouse please. I am a newbie and this is my first season with a greenhouse so i'm still finding my feet.

One of the veggies i would love to have a home grown supply of in winter are parsnips, can this be done? The others are chantenay carrots? Asparagus is another but i do know it can take up to two years to establish the plant before it starts yielding a decent crop so might get on that one next spring, unless any of you have some tips .

Anyway all that aside this might be a good thread to list some top winter veggies we can all have a go at so any suggestions or tips for us all would be great 

08/07/2014 at 18:02
Possibly carrots, im afraid its too late for parsnips really, they are normally sown early, i think you can plant asparagus in autumn, but it will still be a long time before you can take any.
Have look on th dt brown/marshalls sites, they will be selling veg plants for winter, most of these can be grown from seed now, its nice to get ideas from these sites tho.
Im growing kale and purple sprouting
08/07/2014 at 19:03
Russian red kale did us proud last winter... Needless to say it is being grown again but not in a greenhouse.
08/07/2014 at 19:05

I'm going for Kale too. Also I grow salad leaves through the winter in the greenhouse.

08/07/2014 at 20:20

I usually sow a couple of rows of Swiss Chard 'Lucullus' at this time of year - I get pickings throughout the autumn and into the winter, and then whenever there's a mild spell there's some more to be picked.  Then, as soon as the early signs of spring arrive it starts into growth again and I carry on picking until early summer. 

And of course, sow Broad beans Aquadulce Claudia in late October and they'll start into growth immediately, continue to grow slowly through the winter and produce a great crop in the spring.  With no need for any protection from the winter weather.  Last year mine were under 18" of snow for what felt like months on end, and we were picking loads of beans in May 

10/07/2014 at 17:08

I grew salald and spinach in the raised bed next to the house last winter. There are a few good winter salads like tatsoi. I did however have issues with baby slugs due to the mild winter and my salad being about the only soft leaves in the garden.

I also did spring onions over winter which came up quickly in the spring for picking. Broad beans are great planted in September /October and picked in April. Not really winter but over winter.

If you have a greenhouse why not try new potatoes for Christmas day,its a bit hit and miss but good fun if it works.


11/07/2014 at 08:06

I overwintered spring onions, chard and spinach beet last year, without a greenhouse. As Nin says, this was more something to keep the beds busy and eat in the spring, but  you may be able to pick a few leaves when it's mild.

16/10/2015 at 16:21

I planted up my new raised beds with winter veg plus I sowed 3 rows of Early Nante carrots into new norfolk topsoil mixed with sand.. I checked just now and all are doing ok and I have an inch batch of carrots coming thru nicely..  My onioms have been planted 3 weeks ago too, so I am quite pleased things are looking good. I'm in Essex so not had a frost as yet..  I am still picking the last few tomatos and might get a few more if I set up my new cloche..

16/10/2015 at 16:34

Ordinary onions, if you use an overwintering variety like Red Baron, although it's a bit late to plant the sets now, unless this mild weather continues.  Garlic is OK planted now, and it may not be too late for broad beans as Dove says.  If you can get some plants from a nursery or kindly neighbour, spring greens and other early brassicas, but I'd say it's too late to sow them now.

Alll the above stay outdoors all winter.  If you want somethng for the greenhouse you could try lettuces, but you have to use the right variety as most won't like the short days, and who wants to eat lettuce in the winter anyway?  Early carrots, like Early Nantes or Amsterdam Forcing might do something but they're really summer crops too and may not cope with the lack of light.  You might try the onions in the greenhouse too.

16/10/2015 at 18:34

BLT.   You could put in some winter carrots (Autum King) that will come good in the Spring.  Lettuce,  a winter hardy one, but still have to cloche if not in a greenhouse.   For early Spring crops, broad beans, broccoli spears, onions, garlic.  Iv seen stuff for sale today, it's not to late.   Strawberry plants and potatoes for Christmas.  

19/10/2015 at 00:18

1Runnybeak Hi, I do have some Autumn Kimg carrots plamted up as well as the Early Nantes .. considering the seed was out of date, they are showing through now..  problem is I am away in a weeks time and have no one to tend my plants as my mate is away too.. Neither of us wanted to go away in the growing season...

I have plamted up most of those you memtioned already.. Lets hope all will be well..

19/10/2015 at 08:29

Hi Everyone, 

really good to see bunch of ppl talkin abt gardening only. I have got few queries for winter veg growing. 

1. I have got new raised bed this year and still full of horse manure and dry leaf which should get decomposed during winter and ready for summer. Would it be a good idea to grow something in horse manure?

2. Wife is pregnant and would really like to avoid something unwanted from raised bed. she loves kale but afraid of growing it in case, i get something from fresh manure filled bed. 

3. New arrival due date is in April so would like to avoid growing something which can give me some work to do in March/April. What finishing work i need to do if i grow kale and other salads? I believe if i just remove it then the bed should be OK for summer growing

4. As the bed is up for first winter then would it be a good idea to leave the bed covered with cardboard to let worms do its job and grow something in summer??

Would really appreciate if you let me know your thoughts. 

Thanks a lot. 

19/10/2015 at 22:48

Antkit Patel

 I am gob dmacked, as a Nidwife of maybe 15 yrs ex-erience what do you think id a hazard from home grown veg.. It is a whole lot better than supermarket offerings11


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