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Supernoodle

Oops, a guilty of skimming.... 

Ta, Panda.

hartleyhare
4thPanda wrote (see)

Noodle, Hartley posted a link to his(?) photo bucket account where two pics can be seen 

 

4thPanda wrote (see)

Noodle, Hartley posted a link to his(?) photo bucket account where two pics can be seen 

 

Her actaully - Hartley is the rabbit

4thPanda

Sorry Hartley. . took a punt and got it wrong  Still love your boat though 

hartleyhare
4thPanda wrote (see)

Love the boat Hartley  Am allowed boat envy? 

Thank you  She's a bit of a project like the house and  garden but is useable. And with the 75 hp engine on back she flies!

hartleyhare wrote (see)
4thPanda wrote (see)

Love the boat Hartley  Am allowed boat envy? 

Thank you  She's a bit of a project like the house and  garden but is useable. And with the 75 hp engine on back she flies!

 

A boat that flies?  Is that like those planes that float on water?

 

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hartleyhare
st ephie wrote (see)
A boat that flies?  Is that like those planes that float on water?
LOL! She feels like she's flying as the bow comes up out of the water when she's up on plane cruising along at 35-40mph ( for some odd reason her speedo says mph and not knots).

 

 

Marinelilium

Harleyhare I garden on a slope and the plant that has kept the bank in place during the deluges is Cotoneaster dammeri. It is an evergreen ground cover that has tiny star flowers that bees love and bright red berries that birds take. It is easy to  chop about it truly low maintenance and secures soil. frogs shelter under ours year round.

not exciting or exotic but gets the job done - bit like me really. : )

hartleyhare
Marinelilium wrote (see)

Harleyhare I garden on a slope and the plant that has kept the bank in place during the deluges is Cotoneaster dammeri. It is an evergreen ground cover that has tiny star flowers that bees love and bright red berries that birds take. It is easy to  chop about it truly low maintenance and secures soil. frogs shelter under ours year round.

not exciting or exotic but gets the job done - bit like me really. : )

Ooh, thank you, I'll have a look around the garden centres or online for it. How big does it spread? I might need more than one.

I'm not exciting or exotic either although I'm not sure I always get the job done - depends on the job

Marinelilium

 Talking of exotics Harleyhare, the ground cover cotoneaster is brilliant for wedging seasonal containers in between the woody branches. Even top heavy plantings manage to stay upright on breezy days.

They spread a good metre and keep weeds at bay Too. So exotic pots and functional soil retention could be 'job done'. 

Marinelilium

Oops I meant Hartleyhare... Harleyhare is a bunny on a bike! 

Tetley

Hello....I`ve always been good at creating this kind of problem too, "it seemed a good idea at the time" syndrome.  As things are at the mo I think it may be a plan to make a pathway by that building and maybe a retaining wall with broken paving slabs against the raised bed.  This has worked in my garden.  I made a row of broken bits of slabs with the best bit showing, and each further row an inch further back, so the whole thing was sloping inwards toward the bank.  That may stop damp getting in to the building, and keep the soil where it should be.  Vinca minor (perriwinkle) and sedum or any ground hugging, spreading plants will help to  keep everything in place.

How about using gabion blocks to act as retaining walls?  Strong mesh "boxes" filled with stone/rubble not only will look attractive but are a relatively cheap solution.

It sounds like you have some rubble already which could be retrieved and used to fill the gabion.

I'm intending to use this solution to part terrace my sloping garden this summer.

 

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