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8 messages
09/10/2012 at 13:11

Hi

Recently moved and want to make the garden look colorful and attract wildlife through each season.  I would like a section to grown own food, but not sure where to put it (just a small area enough to grow for fun)

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/14804.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/14805.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/14806.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/14807.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/14808.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/14809.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

We plan to uplift the decking and only have small section of it in front of conservatory, so any ideas to fill in new exposed area would also me welcome.

I'm total beginner, so would very much appreciate any help with design ideas. I have attached some pictures, and by back garden faces North if that helps.

Thanks

 

09/10/2012 at 15:52

It clearly needs lots of TLC to get it fit to grow anything! Random thoughts in no particular order:

Do you have pets? Children? Factor their needs in. How much time do you want to spend in it? (will dictate annual versus perennial mix). Do you need a lawn? (you'll never get a decent one in shade) Assuming you don't spend the winter taking that up, digging it all over and adding as much compost/manure as you can. See where the sun falls (remembering it wil be different in summer). Test the soil. Look to see what you like that is growing in neighbouring gardens - it will do well in yours.

North facing is tricky for veg - I would start off with a small raised bed in the sunniest spot. Easy stuff - runner beans, lettuce, herbs etc.

Get the structure in first. Think about hard landscaping - paths, benches etc.

You won't get it 'right' first time - or even ever. It's a lifelong addiction - good luck!

09/10/2012 at 17:39

Hi Frozz, you certainly have some work on there but I wouldn't be in a rush to do anything permanently, observe where the sun falls throughout winter and summer. Seating areas will be important depending on wether you like sun or shade. Good luck

09/10/2012 at 19:31

I agree with the above. I would plan a courtyard garden with lots of structural and architectural plants and adding colour with annuals. It looks way too shaded for veg from the photos. You need full sun for that TBH.

09/10/2012 at 19:40
Thanks guys
Pictures were taken early morning so will check where sun hits and where the shade is.

Anyone recomend some plants? I have put some bulbs in to see if they grow.
09/10/2012 at 19:41

Why do you want to remove the decking?

I would use that a seating area and container garden.

10/10/2012 at 13:35

I would move water butt to a down pipe. and in that small area where it is put in a couple of 'dalek' composters. Your local council may have a deal on so you can get them cheap. You can check on getcomposting.com by entering post code. The bins -although slow would give you soil improver.

I would certainly wait until sure of where sun goes as that will help you with which plants to obtain. First though make a list of what everyone in your house would like to use the garden for, then sort it out and work out where your hard landscaping would go - youmay not need to move all that decking and suitable places for wverything else. All that decking - could it be used to make raised beds for both flowers and vegetables?

I strated with the family list 2 and half years ago and still refer to it when opening up a new area. Remember a garden is not a quick fix and to take an area at a time is best and you learn more about your garden as you do each area.

11/10/2012 at 17:38

You can grow vegetables in a shady garden you just need to accept that you wont get bumper crops and some will do better than others. A general rule of thumb for veg and herbs is that leafy crops will do better than those that flower and fruit. So salads, spinach, chard, kale, cauliflowers (although these are tricky anywhere), brussel sprouts etc should be fine. You can grow beans but crops may not be as large as on a plant in the sun.

Mint, parsley, chives and lemon balm are all quite happy in the shade.

 

 

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