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5 messages
23/03/2014 at 16:09

Hello everyone,

 

I am a relative newbie to gardening. My dad is very much into gardening, and I learned some very basic tips and things from him, it wasn't something I was overly interested in as a child.

 

But as I live in my own (well rented) property, and the opportunity has arisen, me and the OH have spent a little bit of time and money in making the garden look attractive.

 

We live in a very built up area, which is very convenient for work, but for that we sacrificed a private, rear garden. What we do have is a off road driveway, with borders, a small patch of grass and a small patio type area which we have started to fill with various pots for a cottagey feel in keeping with the house. We don't want to do too much to the borders as we may not be here a long time with ever changing jobs, and I'd hate to put a lot of work into it, and then to not be able to enjoy them and watch it bloom, which is difficult enough as it is, with it being a front garden, with no privacy. Oh how I long for a rear garden with fences and a bench which I can sit in and lap up!

I bought the OH a very small, and cheap, greenhouse in which to store our propagators, which leads me to my main query, when we planted our seeds we would share a packet of seeds per row of cells, and there's six cells per row. We planted them a week ago to the day, and we've had significant growth from my Zinnia's, Carnations and Dahlia's, and his Marigolds. They have sprouted up thick and fast, around 10 seedlings per tray. When should we thin them, and how severely? And should it be one packet of seeds per propagator?

 

As I say, I'm a total novice at growing from seed, so any need to know tips are much appreciated.

23/03/2014 at 18:42

When they've grown big enough to handle and have their first real leaves, not just the seedling ones, you pot them on into fresh compost in little pots, or saved yoghurt pots with holes for drainage in the bottom. If they are only a week old they are probably still too young. When you pot them on you hold them very gently by the leaves, not touching the stems, and using a pencil or a plastic plant label ease the seedling carefully out and drop it into a hole in the compost in the new pot having made the hole with a pencil. Push the compost carefully around the seedling and water it. Then when there is no more risk of frost you can plant them in the garden.

As for how many to sow (you sow a seed and plant a plant), it depends how many there are in the packet. A dahlia seed is a reasonable size, you can sow each one individually into modules or about an inch apart in trays. Some seeds, like petunias and lobelia are really tiny, much harder to sow.

23/03/2014 at 19:35
Busy-Lizzie wrote (see)

When they've grown big enough to handle and have their first real leaves, not just the seedling ones, you pot them on into fresh compost in little pots, or saved yoghurt pots with holes for drainage in the bottom. If they are only a week old they are probably still too young. When you pot them on you hold them very gently by the leaves, not touching the stems, and using a pencil or a plastic plant label ease the seedling carefully out and drop it into a hole in the compost in the new pot having made the hole with a pencil. Push the compost carefully around the seedling and water it. Then when there is no more risk of frost you can plant them in the garden.

As for how many to sow (you sow a seed and plant a plant), it depends how many there are in the packet. A dahlia seed is a reasonable size, you can sow each one individually into modules or about an inch apart in trays. Some seeds, like petunias and lobelia are really tiny, much harder to sow.

See I probably planted 10-20 seeds per cell with the dahlias.  Thank you for the advice though... I think come payday I'll be taking a trip to the Oxfam bookshop.

23/03/2014 at 20:47

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bK2VDbDCzYw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6GRO7Ai6BU

Hello Sweetpea, there's a lot of videos on youtube that might help.  The 2 links are just a start. 

23/03/2014 at 21:42

Hi Sweatpea and welcome  As you will see from my name, I'm not much use in advice but just wanted to say that in this month's GW there is a supplement called Small Garden Handbook, if you don't normally get the mag it may be worth it as there are some lovely ideas in it  (I have no affiliation to GW magazine by the way )

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