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22/07/2012 at 03:23

Hello Folks,

Now that the sun has come out, it's time to assess the rain damage and the delay in flowering that the lack of warmth has caused...

The first two photos show the position and pattern of the screening I've had to put up to try and prevent dog fouling. Yeah, it beats me too!

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst44.jpg

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst45.jpg

 

The Verbena Bonariensis is totally living up to the promises made by the nursery. However, there's been a distinct lack of insect life around it. I just love its open airiness yet distinct stature.

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst46.jpg

 

The Echinops Compositae Vietch's Blue are a bit behind and not really looking as good as they should and again, no insect interest in them yet...

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst47.jpg

 

The spring flowering alpines have made way for the summer ones though their not as pretty. Despite quite a brutal haircut, the hardy geraniums have bounced back bigger than ever, but no sign of a second flowering...
 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst48.jpg

 

Plenty of colour along the front, although the pelargoniums are weeks behind with their flowering - there should be a riot of fire colours emanating from those window boxes.
 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst50.jpg

 

The hanging baskets are very disappointing indeed. This one might look OK, but it's been devastated by winds and the riot of blossom it should be by now is absent. Hopefully, some warm weather will help in the next few days.
 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst51.jpg

 

Regards,
Steve

22/07/2012 at 07:39

That's come on quite well considering the season we've had - I should think you're justifiably very pleased.  I haven't even bothered with hanging baskets and tubs this year - been too busy nurturing perennials in the cold and damp.

Is your garden south facing?

22/07/2012 at 14:26
Dovefromabove wrote (see)

Is your garden south facing?

It faces S.East. At this time of year the bungalow casts a shadow upon it from about 3.30pm onwards - when we  have some sun, that is...  

Regards,
Steve

22/07/2012 at 19:51

It's still impressive, despite the rubbish weather we've all had to contend with.  Keep us up-dated, please.  I think this an inspired planting scheme!

12/08/2012 at 15:07

An update...

 I'm quite pleased with the progress - what's also surprised me is how quickly this raised bed seems to have matured into into its setting. I could probably now get away with claiming that it has been there for years...

Let's get the sad bit out of the way first. I don't want to believe that a sign like this is necessary, but, so far, it has been effective.

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst57.jpg

 

 


 

So, onto the colour...

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst52.jpg

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst53.jpg

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst54.jpg

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst55.jpg

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst56.jpg

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst58.jpg

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst59.jpg

 

 

 

http://files.myopera.com/Peter_LT/albums/12189332/sunburst60.jpg

Regards,
Steve 

13/11/2012 at 23:33

Hi, great photos,

 

I'm looking at building some raised beds in the new year, and i'm wondering what sort of wood you used for yours? as it looks really good. I have toyed with the idea of railway sleepers but this is working out to be too expensive.

Many thanks

Steve

 

14/11/2012 at 09:55

Looks like the sort of pressure-treated softwood that you can cut to size from any proper timber merchant.

17/11/2012 at 18:58

I have a bit of garden outside the fence and initially found that some idiot was letting their dog foul the pavement there and the owner was kicking it in amongst the flowers. This means that I always have to wear bullet proof rubber gloves when I garden that area. I adore dogs and am about to get one, but surely dog owners realise by now how dangerous dog faeces are to human (esp. children's and pregnant mother's) health. Perhaps this is something that Gardeners World could comment on.

I adore what you have done LowiePete with your front garden, it is very stylish.

18/11/2012 at 15:46
Thanks again for the kind comments folks. 
artjak wrote (see)

...surely dog owners realise by now how dangerous dog faeces are to human (esp. children's and pregnant mother's) health

You'd certainly think so, but I'm still in some disbelief that I had to put such a sign in place. What gets me is that they actually watch their pet do it! There isn't _any_ possibility of the owners not knowing...

artjak wrote (see)

I adore what you have done LowiePete with your front garden, it is very stylish.

Thanks, it has been very satisfying on all sorts of levels, not least in how passers-by react. In truth, it has worked out even better that how I'd imagined it in my mind's eye.

Steve Worthing wrote (see)

I'm looking at building some raised beds in the new year, and i'm wondering what sort of wood you used for yours?

It's just treated softwood in 3 metre lengths. It isn't just the cost of the wood though, there was over 6 tonnes of topsoil added into the bed, though with its slight coning toward the buried bin that might mean an extra tonne over having it level.

 Including about £350 for planting, bearing in mind that most of the surface is covered in coloured stones, the total cost was just shy of £1,000. This included labour and ancilliary ground works tidying up the patch twixt the car runway and the new bed, and repairing the fence. Added to that, the lights were £50 and the 7 trellis panels another £35.00

Regards,
Steve

18/11/2012 at 17:55

Love the work but as a vet can I please say that a regularly wormed dog is no risk to humans!

18/11/2012 at 22:27

Steve, I did not realise that it is only un-wormed dogs that are bad news healthwise for children and pregnant women. Sadly we cannot know how many owners cannot afford to de-worm their pets in the current economic climate.

18/11/2012 at 23:11
Artjak, don't be making apologies! 
Steve Johnson wrote (see)

can I please say that a regularly wormed dog is no risk to humans!

Ohhh, right, we all know how often a dog is wormed - they wear a tagged indicator to clearly show this, not, and I should observe this as I clear up behind them. Come on, as a vet, you should know better than to provide downright misleading excuses for people who let their dog  anywhere, supervised, without a second's thought of the consequences! Words fail me, beyond belief!!!

If this is how low this topic descends, can we please get back to the gardening, promptly?

Regards,
Steve

19/11/2012 at 12:55

well,that looks to be a very good idea and just shows how inventive one can be.thats the garden of course.

19/11/2012 at 14:51

The health risk to humans is extreme loss of temper, and only the dog-owners can cure it.

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