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16 messages
12/05/2013 at 12:50

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/23406.jpg?width=272&height=350&mode=max

 

Hi  have found a clump of these plants in my local wood any idea what it is. Big heart shaped leaves and almost a peace lily shaped flower but not as pretty

12/05/2013 at 12:53

Cuckoo pint, Lords & Ladies, Wild Arum - known by lots of names http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arum_maculatum

Sometimes the leaves have black spots, sometimes they do not.

 

12/05/2013 at 13:01

Many thanks dovefromabove. I think I may dig up one ( there are loads) to put in my shady border as they look so unusual

12/05/2013 at 13:10

Sorry but that is not a good idea trifid house.

1. it is illegal to dig up plants from the wild.

2. It can be an invasive pest in gardens.

Lyn
12/05/2013 at 13:33

3, the berrys are poisinous, so if you have children or pets, its not a good idea.

12/05/2013 at 14:04

Please don't do that trifid house - it is illegal - wild plants need protection - and they do not transplant well so you are likely to kill it.  

Arum pictum italicum is the cultivated form and can be obtained from many nurseries 

Google it's name and you'll find many pictures.  As Lyn says, please remember that the berries are poisonous.

12/05/2013 at 15:04

Briliant dovefromabove thanks for the link

12/05/2013 at 15:23

It also smells of faeces or vomit which is how it attracts moths etc!.

It doesn't come under the illegal to remove types, included in CITES etc I checked that first only the theft act if you do not have permission from the landowner or own the land. But it is staying where it is as the smell gets strong in the evening. I was blaming the local sewerage works! Lol

12/05/2013 at 16:31

Please think twice about introducing the wild form into your garden.  It produces tiny bulbils deep down in the ground and like ground elder you think you've dug it all out but then back it comes if you've left the tiniest bulb behind.  It spreads mercilessly.  Enjoy it in the local woods and plant an Italicum instead - much prettier leaves and more controllable.

12/05/2013 at 16:33

Have loads growing in the garden and forever trying to get rid of them as i worry about the berries and the cats eating or licking them

12/05/2013 at 16:41

When Tom and I were first married(-many years ago-)

 

 

 

 

When Tom and I were first married we used to visit Farndale in Yorkshire which was covered in daffodills.

People used to walk away with armfuls. which eventually almost  destroyed the area. It then became illegall to pick them.

                                                                       joan

 

 

 

 

 

12/05/2013 at 23:28

No plants should ever be taken from any nature reserve or nature trail and it is illegal for anyone, without permission of the owner or occupier of the land, to uproot any wild plant. A number of very rare plants in danger of extinction, or likely to become so, are specially protected by law, and removal or sale of any part of these plants is an offence. A person found guilty of breaking these laws may be fined up to £1,000, and if more than one plant is involved, this fine may be imposed for each of them. The Botanical Society of the British Isles lists species protected by the Wildlife and Countryside Act of 1981.

 

 

Hope this helps.

13/05/2013 at 09:37

Just a note on the berries. Whilst they are poisonous, it would take a very determined person to eat more than one. The sensation is likened to having a mouthful of sharp needles.

Birds can and do eat them.

13/05/2013 at 14:03

You SHOULD NOT TAKE ANY PLANT FROM THE WILD.    THIS IS WHAT CREATES EXTINCTION .  MANY OF OUR NATIVE PLANTS  ARE EXTINCT.  YOU CAN BUY THE CULTIVATED PLANTS FROM THE NURSERY .  

ALSO WHAT YOU SHOULD TAKE INTO MIND IS THE FACTTHAT YOU CAN BRING VIRUS AND DISEASE INTO YOURS AND EVERYONE S GARDEN NEARBY MANY DISEASES WILL KILL CULTIVATED PLAN TS WHICH YOU HAVE.  WHEN PLAN TS GROW IN THE WILD LIKE THIS THEY B UILD UP THEIR OWN IMMUNE SYSTEM  . CULTIVATED PLANTS  ARE NOT SO INDISTRuCTABLE. .

SO PLEASE DO NOT  BRING WILD INTO CULTIVATED . 

SCIENTISTS  USE  THE GENETICS OF WILD FLOWERS   FOR THE GOOD OF CULTIVATED , DISEASE  FREE  NEW STRAIN PLANTS.

13/05/2013 at 14:07

If you still want some in your shady border ask Maud to send you some - sounds like you can have some of hers and gladly just for the asking.

13/05/2013 at 14:23

I forgot to say if you do want a plant from this family look at Arum Dracunculus . This is masive The flower spike is burgendy  mine measured  from the bulbus part to the tip a whacking 32 inches . The leaves are very attractive ,it realy is a big plant , Beautiful the day it is fully out -Infact at each stage its intresting . BUT this is what I advise : Plant at the bottom of your garden - it realy does stink . First year I had a flower on this I was looking round for the victim . Living in the country with surrounding fields my first suspect was a pheasent had died somewhere close by. But it was the plant in flower . Makes a good photo shot - which is why I keep it !  The Yellow ones too of the same family are attractive - these grow near water   I have only seen them in a national trust property - can't remember which one but think it was in Cheshire.but I cant say wether they smell or not . I am not meaning the cultivated  smell less type which you CAN buy in a pot from the nurseries. 

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