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04/08/2014 at 07:29

I recently posted a thread about Japanese Anenomes.  A beautiful thug that has caused real problems in my garden.   I find it really difficult to deal with this sort of plant as heavy digging causes problems due to a medical condition.  I'm assuming the this is not the only plant that might charm me into buying it only to become a real nuisance in the future.  I wondered if you might suggest others I might avoid.  There are plenty of well behave plants out there that I would prefer to use.  If you know them please include any common names as I might not recognise the proper names.  Thanks in anticipation.

04/08/2014 at 07:33

It seems that plants that have 'Japanese' or 'Himalayan' in their common name seem to be a thug and are really attractive too. 

KEF
04/08/2014 at 07:41

Yvie I have problems with alchemilla mollis and houttuynia I've had to resort to chemical warfare with them both.

04/08/2014 at 07:51
I think anything with creeper in the name should be treated with suspicion! V.creeper, creeping buttercup, creeping jenny, who on earth named these creepers! More like sprinting, barging thugs!
04/08/2014 at 07:59

 I Thanks, I have had problems with houttuynia in the past and have just pulled up a recently planted alchemilla mollis after picking up a thread about it on this website.  I wish garden centres would warn people about these plants, I had only ever heard really nice things about alchemilla mollis until recently.  I have learned to check the spread on plants and if it says indefinitely I avoid like the plague but its not always stated.  I do have a bit of a problem with comfrey but its easy to remove even though it shoots up all over the garden.

04/08/2014 at 08:06

It has to be Kerria for me.

04/08/2014 at 08:27

Each garden is so different as I had trouble getting alchelmilla mollis to grow! Eventually it was successful and I have just one clump but it doesn't seem to spread like others have found.

04/08/2014 at 08:32
My jap anemonies havent spread either, but they are in that "trouble" border ive been moaning about, suppose i should be grateful
KEF
04/08/2014 at 08:41

Very true Forester.  

04/08/2014 at 08:42

Euphorbia Fireflow/griffithii is a thug as are some varieties of artemisia, ESP the yellow limelight.  Some campanulas can spread as can lysimachia.  Salvia guaranitica as well as uliginosa can spread a bit......So I dig these up every year. Hypericum calicynum is invasive.....very invasive. Some grassss, pennisetums for example, can spread markedly.  I think houttynia chameleon has already been mentioned but this is a real problem once it gets into the ground.  Think bindweed and double the aggression! 

I always research plants I don't know before planting.  However, there is nothing like your own experience so I plant some things with a view to check them at the end of the season.  If the roots are "travelling" everything goes.  When buying plants often a look at the root systems can indicate what they will do.  

Currently I am watching my libertias....two vsrieties of the newer golden/olive ones......to see how they behave.  So far, after 3 or 4 years, they are fine.  I divide them anyway quite regularly 

So much in the garden is "invasive"......think raspberries..?

Gardening is a constantly learning experience,,isn't it? 

04/08/2014 at 09:04

Hypericum or Rose of Sharon is a thug that's difficult to dig out.   The yellow form of lysimachia can get very happy and spread by root invasions.   It's cousin, lysimachia clethroides alba, is much more attractive and much easier to dig or fork out or pull up after rain.

Alchemilla mollis is only a problem if you let  the flowers go to seed.   I cut them off anyway as I have never liked acid yellows and greens.

My echinops ritro is very happily seeding itself about but the seedlings are easy to hoe or pull up or dig up witha trowel and ot up for friends. 

Phytolacca americana self seeds all over the place too but again is easy to deal with at seedling stage.

KEF
04/08/2014 at 09:46

A mollis, I cut off the flowerheads, must have missed some but it can't have been many as I was at it each day. It even spread into the lawn and different parts of the garden. It just loved it here.  

04/08/2014 at 09:51
All hypercicum? Was rather taken by that one with very cupped flowers on GW last week, not that i have a spot for it!

Wild dasies/ moon dasies? Those large ones that come as "wild flower seed" they grow in almost total shade, drought, winter, they are the terminator of the plant world!
04/08/2014 at 11:59

Hi Bekkie,  I have an hypericum, it is the bush variety and it doesnt spread.  it has the same beautiful yellow flowers.  The variety is Kouytchende (or at least I think thats how its spelt).  I find it very each to keep in check I just cut it back in the spring and away it goes.

04/08/2014 at 12:02
Good to know Yvie, thanks
04/08/2014 at 12:23

I have a campanula thats spreads a bit its called silver bells but it is so attractive and it flowers all through the summer that its worth the little bit of extra work.  Someone on here, I think it was Verdun, said that if the pleasure it gives outweighs the work its worth keeping.  In this case it  is.

04/08/2014 at 12:26
Evening primrose! Grrrr, roots that go down to the devil and that lavetera stuff, again from wild flower mix!
04/08/2014 at 12:36

Chinese Lanterns

04/08/2014 at 12:57

I can't get those to grow in my my garden.  Honesty no probs but not physalis.

04/08/2014 at 16:20

Hi Bekkie are you talking about the bush lavatera.  I have grown these in most of the houses I have owned and they have never spread.  I know there are other types.  I had been thinking about evening primrose but thanks for the warning.  The problem I suspect is that I have great soil here and whatever I plant generally does well (except plants that specifically like poorer soil) thats why things like japanese anenomes go beserk.

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