London (change)
Today 16°C / 14°C
Tomorrow 16°C / 8°C
1 to 20 of 22 messages
18/03/2014 at 09:08
Good morning everyone! I am an immensely keen gardener and would place myself in the competent bracket however I am always keen to learn more. Particularly identifying plants, understanding their preferred habitat (soil type, shade/semi shade etc), pruning requirements and I am looking for a book which may cater for this and perhaps even a bit more. Visual aids a must! I have spent most of my working life jumping on trains at 6.00 in the morning to travel into London and finally said enough is enough, handed in my notice and now work for a small local garden maintenance firm and I love it! I need to read, practice and study so I can achieve my main goal which is to become my own boss one day. So, in summary, what would you recommend as good books to start with? Thanks in advance!
18/03/2014 at 09:16

hi, buds i'm a newbie really, everything i've learned is from here, gw programme, and the newish alan titchmarsh 'how to' books, got 5 in series, sit and read when little ones feeding / napping i think they're excellent really easy to follow

18/03/2014 at 09:20

You need the gardener's bible - RHS A to Z Encyclopedia of Garden Plants.

18/03/2014 at 09:27

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shrubs-garden-plant-Roger-Phillips/dp/0330302582

There's a whole range of books by these 2, perennials, annuals, bulbs etc. Good illustrations and where they come from which gives a good indication of what they need.

Also Christopher Lloyd, earlier books rather than later, very informative and a good read.

and Bamboogie's RHS book

 

18/03/2014 at 09:47

To Bamboogies suggestion I would definitely add the RHS Encyclopaedia of Gardening too...........immensely useful.

18/03/2014 at 15:37

Maybe a good idea is to go to your public library and look at their books.  Once you have found something that appeals to you in its style and content, then it is worth buying your own - or asking for it as a gift come birthdays or whatever.  Many gardening books are very expensive, and some just not suitable for everyone - as yet, libraries are free - and if we don't use them they will disappear.  

Edd
18/03/2014 at 17:10

Love the way you think Bookertoo

18/03/2014 at 17:56

Hi Buds, I am a newcomer like many on here and I have got some of my best books from our local charity shops - including RHS, Readers' Digest and Dr Hessayon's stuff - usually for about 50p or £1 each. Newer books such as some of the ones mentioned by others above here have been on my birthday and Christmas lists and I too recommend the RHS Encyclopedia of Garden Plants - I read it nearly every night like a saddo! Enjoy and good luck - I admire and envy your career change, wish I had the courage!

18/03/2014 at 18:08

The RHS Encyclopedia; 2 volumes, keeps my biceps in trim as I consult them often. The only prob; new plants are being developed all the time. So when I go mad and buy something; the actual plant is not in the book, only it's relatives.

I'm sure some enterprising 14 year old will develop an 'app' that constantly updates the RHS plant books

For veg; 'The vegetable and plant expert'

For lawns; get a husband and let him deal with it! Otherwise have a tiny lawn.

18/03/2014 at 18:27

I agree with Bamboogie the R.H.S Dictionary A to Z  is the ultimate reference book.If you are serious, worth the money.

Mike W

 

 

 

18/03/2014 at 18:46
Some fantastic advice everyone! Much appreciated! The RHS encyclopedia sounds like a must, as does a visit to a few charity shops and our local library!
????
18/03/2014 at 19:31

Good for you Buds......both for your career change and for using the library

18/03/2014 at 19:33

PS.........when you own your own Nursery/Landscape Gardening business, I do So hope you will remember your friends here

18/03/2014 at 19:45

Beth Chattos series of books are good to study for what to plant in dry area, or damp areas, etc. Also I love anything by Christopher Lloyd.

18/03/2014 at 21:55

The best advice this old timer can give is. Get involved. Hands on.  As with learning another language, vist the country, live with the people.   If it's books that help you.  The I suggest keeping an eye on ebay, under gardening books.  Also take a look at some of the ads re: book clubs.  Many of the more expensive gardening books can be obtained free, be careful and coy.

18/03/2014 at 22:01

DK books publish three books which I have RHS Good plant guide, RHS Plants for Places, RHS Pruning guide they are pocket size too so would fit in your butty bag. They are very informative. I keep the pruning guide in my car all the time as occasionally I would come across a shrub or tree that I hadn't pruned before, now there isn't many trees and shrubs that I haven't pruned in customer's gardens. Having the pruning guide will ensure your pruning at the right time and how much to take off. You can pick some good books up cheap at car boot sales. The RHS also have a good website. 

18/03/2014 at 22:12

By the way I career changed a few years back, I do Garden Maintenance and Landscaping. Best decision I made you get great satisfaction from making peoples gardens look great. My season started last spring has not stopped right the way through this winter as it's been so mild I haven't had the usual drop in the workload so it has been really great. Also if you believe the powers that be we are supposed to be having a better summer than the last one.

18/03/2014 at 22:16

DK books publish three books which I have RHS Good plant guide, RHS Plants for Places, RHS Pruning guide they are pocket size too so would fit in your butty bag. They are very informative. I keep the pruning guide in my car all the time as occasionally I would come across a shrub or tree that I hadn't pruned before, now there isn't many trees and shrubs that I haven't pruned in customer's gardens. Having the pruning guide will ensure your pruning at the right time and how much to take off. You can pick some good books up cheap at car boot sales. The RHS also have a good website. 

18/03/2014 at 22:23

I agree RHS books are excellent and can be bought relatively cheap from charity shops , personally if you have an Oxfam book shop these are particularly  good also don't forget Libraries  

however somebody mentioned  hands on and I feel that's essential 

best of luck

19/03/2014 at 12:09

Just an idea - I have seen boxes full of RHS reference books at auction houses when they sell off the contents of a house following someone's demise.  These boxes tend to sell for peanuts - you may not want all the books in the box but it's often still cheaper to buy the boxful and keep the books you want and take the rest to the charity shop.

If the sale is from the home of a keen gardener you may find garden tools being sold too. 

1 to 20 of 22 messages