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4 messages
30/04/2014 at 09:17

Hi,

We're trying to work out how to care for these unknown roses in our garden. We moved in last year and did some gentle pruning at the start of winter, which seems to have worked well as the bushes now have a large number of buds showing (and one very healthy flower!) - but we want to make sure we're doing the right thing with them and hoped someone could help identify the type, or at least give guidance on case based on the photos below...

Also, they have been very uncared for for many years - and have grown awfully high and leggy (some shoots are up to 8 ft long!) - can we cut it right back in Autumn? We don't want to harm it, but it's currently only flowering at the ends of the these long tendrils, and we want to make it into more of a bush - with flowers not just at the very top!

http://s27.postimg.org/sn9ja99xf/IMG_1153.jpg

 

http://s27.postimg.org/vest0v8g3/IMG_1149.jpg

 

http://s27.postimg.org/944y0wb5v/IMG_1157.jpg

 

http://s27.postimg.org/os657oqrn/IMG_1156.jpg

 

30/04/2014 at 09:36

It looks like a climber as it's so tall. It would flower better if you spread the stems along the wall rather than just going up.Screw eyelets into the wall to attach them to. It could also be a shrub, but I would have expected it to be bushier. Did you shorten any of the stems? Hybrid teas have single flowers at the end of stems but it's too tall to be a hybrid tea. Unless it is a climbing version of one, like Ena Harkness.

30/04/2014 at 10:16

As Busy-Lizzie says, climbers flower best if you train the main stems as horizontally as possible - this stimulates the development of side shoots which bear the flowers.

You've got a great wall for doing this.  You'll need some vine-eyes and wires fixed to the wall.  And then look at this video about how to train and prune a climbing rose

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rf7F5qhChFM 

Hope that's helpful. 

02/05/2014 at 16:30

Thank you so much - we didn't think they could be climbers as they seemed able to support their own weight - shows how little we know! Your advice has been so useful!

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