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tattianna

I've bought a Clematis florida sieboldii which is in a very small pot and the poor thing needs planting out.

I'm sure I read somewhere that clematis benifit from being planted really deeply. Is this correct?

If so is it ok to bury some of the new growth at the base of the plant (there is quite a lot of young leaves at the base)?

Many thanks

Anna

Berghill

Generally speaking, yes, they do need planting deeply. And burying the new young growth will do it no harm.  Just be careful not to damage the new shoots when backfilling the hole.

Alina W

Yes, plant about 6" deeper than in the current pot.

Don't be alarmed next spring when your clematis appears to be dead long after all others have come into growth - they are very late in coming into leaf.

Depending on where you are Sieboldii can be a bit tender. A beautiful one non the less.

Shrinking Violet

I've earmarked this one - though I wasn't going to buy one until (if!) we have moved.  But I see there's a special offer by GW, and I'm so tempted to buy & keep it in a pot until I can plant it out.  Is that a plan?  Or madness?

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BobTheGardener
Shrinking Violet wrote (see)

I've earmarked this one - though I wasn't going to buy one until (if!) we have moved.  But I see there's a special offer by GW, and I'm so tempted to buy & keep it in a pot until I can plant it out.  Is that a plan?  Or madness?

I suspect the one on offer will be a large plug.  When I buy those, I pot them on anyway so they can grow a good root system before planting, so my advice would be to go for it and pot it up into as deep a pot as you have (I normally use ones with about 5" diameter but about 8" deep.)

Alina W

I grow two permanently in large pots and they're doing well, so there should be no issues.

Shrinking Violet

Thank you for your encouragement.  (Exit stage right waving cheque in one hand . . . )

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