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anthony mcglen

hi all a few weeks ago I had a mishap with my clematis, I caught it with my hoe and cut it to ground level . have I killed it off or is it to cold and early to see any new growth.

many thanks

hollie hock

Sorry don't know, the clems I have here are all growing, fingers crossed

Give it time it will grow back, they're tougher than they look.

Dovefromabove

Yes, unless you're much unluckier than I've ever been it'll grow back, probably bigger and stronger than before - all you need is patience 

I have found patience to be a virtue generally with clematis. They all seem to start growing at different times throughout Spring and at different rates. Also established clematis are much stronger growers that new plants, which at least in my experience, seem to take a year or two to find their feet. I have more than once thought I had a dead clematis on my hands, only to find it shooting away a few weeks later.

As Dove says, it's certainly worth leaving the decapitated plant in place and if it doesn't grow so strongly this season, leave it to give it a further chance next year if possible.

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chicky

Am hoping you are right - it was a mouse, not a hoe, that decapitated Dr Ruppel - but hoping he will recover

Fairygirl

If you mark it with a cane or a little wire cage or something and label it anthony, it'll help prevent damaging it when you're working with any other plants around it. Don't want you doing the same thing again. I just managed to avoid damaging an emerging fern yesterday when I got a bit enthusiastic with my trowel!  

I cover all my new clematis with an upturned terracotta pot whose bottom I have gently bashed out with a hammer.   This saves them from OH who can be very gung hoe and has decapitated several.

I've had cleatis come back after being decapitated and after being frozen to death above ground so I suggest you give the roots a liquid tonic of rose or tomator fertiliser every week or so until mid summer and again next spring.  Don't give up on it for at least two summers.

Fairygirl wrote (see)

If you mark it with a cane or a little wire cage or something and label it anthony, it'll help prevent damaging it when you're working with any other plants around it. Don't want you doing the same thing again. I just managed to avoid damaging an emerging fern yesterday when I got a bit enthusiastic with my trowel!  

Why would calling it 'Anthony' help prevent further damage Fairygirl?

Fairygirl

Well - it might be a 'boy' clematis  LL    

Stacey Docherty

I did something similar to my new sieboldii... About a month now and new shoots have just started to appear

What a shame Anthony but it sounds like there's hope for your clematis.  It is disappointing though, but very understandable - I got a bit carried away with trying to clear wild garlic (yes, still trying to clear it) and my spade slipped into a really promising Eremurus Cleopatra.  It was very interesting to see the orange roots though.  I've shoved it back into its hole and I'm hoping for the best.

anthony mcglen

thankyou all for all your kind words I will leave alone and see what happens to it.

charleyD did you go throw it and was it cut in two I wonder if it did could you get a free plant from your mistake  he he he 

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