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Hey guys.


I have a potted camellia sinensis which has lots of brown tipped leaves. Brown tips have been there for a good few weeks now, and I was advised that it had been over watered (the pot it came in had terrible drainage). I moved it to a new pot, with better drainage and have only watered it when the soil is dry at the top, but the brown spots are just very slowly getting worse. I had a peak at the roots near the top and saw that some of them are brown in colour rather than a pale white ish. I don't want to prune the roots unless I have to but I fear it is root rot and I'm going to have to repot again. I've attached some photos at the bottom. Sorry they aren't better quality, happy to post more.

PS - I wasn't emptying the saucer after water flowed into it initially, but have since started doing that. Also, I put an inch or so of stones at the Base of the pot before filling it with soil so I'm not sure the soil would have been able to soak any of that water up.

I'm no expert on the tea-plant , but I would clean the roots completely , cut off any suspect root material and repot in new compost (ericaceous) . Keep plant out of direct sun , moist and out of drying winds until clean new leaves appear . Camellia sinensis can be pruned if needed ; this treatment seems to work for me for most evergreens .

PS !!! Try and use only rainwater .

DimWit

Root rot usually affects the lower leaves first (or so I think). In my poor opinion, the marks on your camellia's leaves look like scorch of some kind (either unusual heat or lime water or concentrated feeding).

Good points DW !

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DimWit says:

Root rot usually affects the lower leaves first (or so I think). In my poor opinion, the marks on your camellia's leaves look like scorch of some kind (either unusual heat or lime water or concentrated feeding).

See original post

 I hope you're right - I don't want to go to the effort of uprooting it if I don't have to, mostly because I'm not confident I would even know what I was doing!

By limewater, do you mean alkaline water? I live in a softwater area so that could be the cause. I'm not sure about the heat, it is indoors and I don't think the heat gets too much for it. Concentrated feeding - I haven't given it any food (although it's original pot had some food in the soil), could that be it?

Either way, what colour would normal roots on a plant of this type and size be? If a brown tinge is normal then, fine, but I worry that the roots should be quite and if so, these roots are damaged because there are quite a few that aren't white.

If your plant is indoors , probably the dry air affecting the foliage . Try it outside in dappled light for a season .

Paul B3 says:

If your plant is indoors , probably the dry air affecting the foliage . Try it outside in dappled light for a season .

See original post

 I have a spritz bottle I use to spray it with water once every other day or so, would that held with this? I can't really put it outside as I live in a flat and don't have a garden.

Hi, the browning of the leaves is just getting worse. I'm getting a bit desperate.

Borderline

The plant should be planted outside. Even in a pot it should be outside right now. I understand you cannot do this, but it will not help the plant. Something is causing some sort of scorching on the leaves and I don't think it's the roots. Try to put it on a west or northwest facing window sill with the window opened up during the day time to see how it goes. 

Hi everyone, I think I may have cracked it. The terracotta pot is covered with lots of white salt markings and the same issue is forming on the top of the soil. It's ericaceous compost and some of the twigs have grown a white crust. I believe this is an indication of over fertilisation? I haven't added any fertiliser so I assume it came with the compost. The general advice online seems to be to flush the soil, so I just wanted to check with you all that this is an OK course of action?

Borderline

I don't think this action is needed. On indoor watered plants and longterm potted plants, it's quite common. The main thing is, accept that it is less likely to thrive in the indoors. In the summer time let it have the sun and natural rain water. 

Borderline says:

I don't think this action is needed. On indoor watered plants and longterm potted plants, it's quite common. The main thing is, accept that it is less likely to thrive in the indoors. In the summer time let it have the sun and natural rain water. 

See original post

Are you sure? I understand that camellias are better suited outdoors, but they can be kept indoors and keeping them indoors alone should not cause this, this badly. If this issue is caused by fertilisation (which I think is likely) and flushing the soil can help then I don't see how it is unnecessary?

Borderline

It's totally up to you. Maybe someone else may offer more advice on this. You seemed convinced it may have been root rot at first, so have cut down with the watering and kept the soil free draining. I don't know what your leaves look like now, but from the pictures, if it remains the same, I think you don't need to do much. Just keep it near a window sill where there is some daylight.

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