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Matty2

Hadn't really thought about it. 

I do ike Verdun's idea of bringing one in just in case though

Really it all depends on the summer and how strong they become.

AndytheScientist

Matty2 mine looks dead as a dodo too. I'm in Blaydon. The other foxgloves around it look fine and are coming through, but no sign of the illumination. Might just still be hiding, but other stuff has started coming up, although no sign of hostas yet here. Daffs only started flowering this week too.

Yep. Mine are dead too. Bought them last year in June as full grown plants in flower. Fab when planted out, but died after they'd finished flowering in October. No sign of growth this year, just a bunch of dead stems. Aklthough winter was a bit nippy here in the SE, most other stuff survived ok. So much for being hardy perennials then.

Mine are in full flower looking fabulous.  If they prove not to be perennial I will complain.  Bought mine from QVC in September and were quite a bargain compared to other prices I saw at the time ...and now.

Bought mine from T&M. Arrived nine months after being ordered. They look OK and appear to be growing - but are nowhere near flowering. I do hope they will be OK. (Live in Dorset).

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Matty2

Mine have flowers buds about to burst and the one I gave away is in flower - owner has green fingers - I do not, I just slog at it to get results.

 X

I planted a large Illumination Pink foxglove in 2012, it's did fine over the summer but didn't survive the winter.  Apparently there has been a Gardening Which report on them (I've not seen it, but was told about it) and apparently they need winter protection.  I live on the right on the NW coast of England and we don't get particularly harsh winters.

Matty2

Had seen another thread and had decided to give them winter protection. Therefore are planted in pots

I know this is an old thread, but how has everyone got on with these this year?

I've just dug mine up to overwinter them. Mine flowered but weren't amazing.

I've also taken some of the florets that seemed to develop half way up the stem and potted them on separately. Had anyone else tried this form of propagation?

Leigh, a very disappointing plant.  Over hyped.  A short term perennial at best. Not a patch on the usual foxgloves .

Yviestevie

I'm leaving mine in the garden to see if they overwinter.  They were OK this summer but not fantastic.

nutcutlet

They're nothing are they. Agree with Verdun, just hyped up.

They are beautiful in the show gardens of Chelsea and the likes, but how do you replicate that in your own garde?

Would seen they prefer drier conditions compared to our native foxglove.
nutcutlet

Warmer I should think Leigh

They are our native digitalis crossed with isoplexis (spelling?), a tender plant.

Yviestevie

It's official after what was a fairly mild winter all 5 of my illumination pink foxgloves are dead, perennial, I think not.

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nutcutlet

Sometimes a new plant just doesn't live up to the hype does it?

I bet all your 'proper' foxgloves are alive and well

KeenOnGreen

 I bought Camelot Rose and Camelot Cream last year. Supposed to be perennial too but no sign of them. Lots have self seeded but they are still very small.  Agree, very disappointing. Next year I will get some going in the greenhouse. 

punkdoc

KonG.

Your seedlings cannot be from Digitalis Illumination Pink, as they are sterile. They must be one of the many other Digitalis species.

chicky

RHS were doing plant trials on foxgloves im the trial fields at Wisley (including illumination pink) a couple of years ago - it was a 3 year trial so will be interesting to see the results.

Anemone wild swan was another much hyped introduction that many had troubles with .....i have one still alive, but lost the rest