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14 messages
25/06/2013 at 17:38

Hi

planted my first foxglove a few weeks ago and the bells are falling off. Is this normal?

 

thanks

25/06/2013 at 17:45

The bells fall off after they are pollinated, and the seed pods form.....or they fall off when they get battered by heavy rain.

25/06/2013 at 18:02

 

The flower spikes continue to grow with new blooms opening above as the lower ones fall off to reveal a seed pod.

25/06/2013 at 18:12

Ok makes sence as bees are all over it 

25/06/2013 at 18:42

the ones I saw still being sold at £7.99 in a local GC were already going over.

25/06/2013 at 18:52

Mmm. I went to the GC today  for some fertiliser. Came out with fertiliser plus £50 worth of plants.  They had lots of new Illumination pink and another colour in the new type of foxglove. £8.99 each. Just starting to flower. Big plants but I think I'll stick with the normal type that just grow themselves from seed.. after all I need at least a dozen.

25/06/2013 at 19:24

I have native foxgloves all over my garden. Some of them reach at least six feet. They grow wild in clearings in the surrounding woodland. There are quite a few bumblebees taking advantage of them, but almost no honey bees.

The best plants always seem to pop up in the most inappropriate places so I will be planting seed next weekend (native variety of course) so that I have some control over them.

25/06/2013 at 20:07

£7.99 for a foxglove - someones having a larrf aren't they? 

07/07/2013 at 15:11

What's the best way to collect foxglove seeds after all flowers have fallen?  Should I let the stems die back then collect or cut the stems off and store them, then collect?

07/07/2013 at 17:04

If it were me I would let the seeds develop on the stems and depending on your style you could just wave the stem about where you would like them to grow or use a paper bag and put the stem upside down and collect them that way.

I do think it's possible to cut the stems off and then collect the seed, but I'm short on space and you have to keep them in damp free conditions

07/07/2013 at 23:02
hollie hock wrote (see)

If it were me I would let the seeds develop on the stems and depending on your style you could just wave the stem about where you would like them to grow or use a paper bag and put the stem upside down and collect them that way.

I do think it's possible to cut the stems off and then collect the seed, but I'm short on space and you have to keep them in damp free conditions

Thanks.  I was wondering whether cutting the stems before they naturally dried would stop full development of the seed, but your answer implies that that doesn't happen.  Is that right?

07/07/2013 at 23:36

By the time they stop flowering the lowermost seed pods are usually ripe and starting to split open (each pod contains hundreds of seeds), so I don't think you need to worry that they won't ripen.

 

07/07/2013 at 23:49

HI, agreed with Bob, i collect them for the next year but there is no correct time to pick the stems, you just have to try to catch them before the wind blows them away,I only had one Foxglove this year though because i didn't prepare 2 years ago-the year before last 

08/07/2013 at 06:00

Thanks everybody.

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14 messages