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I saw this on Countryfile and so I applied for free wild flower seeds which I sowed today. Thought I would share, as they seem to be doing lots of free seed give aways. Another one was running over the weekend so thought I'd spread the news. 

https://www.growwilduk.com/ 

 

nutcutlet

Good idea Peanuts. I love a good native wildflower and so do the insects.

Orchid Lady

I've got my wildflower seeds still to sow too and some Poppy's and cornflowers too  I love wild flowers 

Shrinking Violet

May I offer a word or two of caution?  There was an interesting article on just this subject in the Weekend section of the Daily Telegraph last Saturday, written by Germaine Greer.

She is extremely knowledgeable and points out that many of the wild flower seeds require diverse habitats.  Throwing a mixed pack of seeds in one place is likely to cause disappointment, since cornflowers, corn cockles and corn marigolds, for example, require different conditions from hedge bedstraw or red campion.  The clue is in the name - and she urges caution, suggesting it would be more beneficial, perhaps, to persuade local authorities to be less cavalier with the clearance of roadside verges etc. if we really do want to encourage wild flowers.

I love to see them - but her article certainly got me thinking.

Sorry - I don't know how to do a link to the actual article, but hopefully it is still available on-line.

 

 

 

 

Fishy65

I'm not sure if I'm too late for the seeds offer anyway.However,I do have Cornflowers and Common Corn-cockle already.

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Obelixx

As with any plant it's a case of right plant right place.    Here's the article - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/gardeningadvice/10785393/Germaine-Greer-stop-weeding-and-let-nature-take-over.html

As well as growing specific wild flowers to support particular species of birds or butterflies and other critters it's important to consider habitat such for shelter and butterflies, for example, will often take nectar from many non native plants they require a specific plant for their eggs and caterpillars.

I think the point is more about raising awareness. this Grow Wild scheme is a 4 year thing and there will be more offers of seeds, so just thought it would be good for people to know it was out there and keep an eye out if they were interested.

Shrinking Vioilet, I see you point, although I'm sure they have thought of that.  Countryfile issued 230,000 packets of these seeds, and I'm sure they went to a diverse range of people.  Some may get some plants that will take, others will get different plants depending on the conditions.  Even if only a small percentage take the environment will still be better off, every little bit helps, and I guess part of it is educating people and raising awareness in general.

Personally I'm looking forward to see which of the seeds suit my conditions and see what pops up. 

Shrinking Violet

I absolutely take your point Peanuts - I was just offering a word of caution given the article I had read.  And thanks, Obelixx for posting the link.

I hope that there are lots more wild flowers in the country as a whole - and I hope that there isn't too much disappointment if some are less easy to germinate than others.

Like I said in my post - it certainly was an article that got me thinking!

 

 

 

 

nutcutlet

I know what you mean SV but you don't often see the difficult ones in the Wildflower mix at the GCs. Some of them aren't even natives though I'm sure they're wild somewhere in the world

Jim Macd
Shrinking Violet wrote (see)

May I offer a word or two of caution?  There was an interesting article on just this subject in the Weekend section of the Daily Telegraph last Saturday, written by Germaine Greer.

She is extremely knowledgeable and points out that many of the wild flower seeds require diverse habitats.  Throwing a mixed pack of seeds in one place is likely to cause disappointment, since cornflowers, corn cockles and corn marigolds, for example, require different conditions from hedge bedstraw or red campion.  The clue is in the name - and she urges caution, suggesting it would be more beneficial, perhaps, to persuade local authorities to be less cavalier with the clearance of roadside verges etc. if we really do want to encourage wild flowers.

I love to see them - but her article certainly got me thinking.

Sorry - I don't know how to do a link to the actual article, but hopefully it is still available on-line.

 

 

 

 

 

I really don't think there's anything to be worrying about. None of the plants you mentioned there are very fussy and I have them all growing in my meadow. Because you find them in a hedge doesn't mean they won't grow in a meadow, it's just they might eventually be out competed but hedge bedstraw & red campion are more than capable of looking after themselves. Besides what is the worst that can happen. By the way. I did my thesis on Wild Flowers in an Ubran Setting and was Conservation rep for a large London Borough. I think Germaine Greer should stick to what she knows best. 

Jim Macd

If you're worried you might have missed out on any offers then I'm sure Emorsgate Seeds will do a very, very, good mix suited perfectly for your situation and soil. They are fantastic and very competitively priced. I have no affiliation with them. Naturescape are good too.  What's more Emorsgate will only offer UK sourced plants and don't do silly garden hybrids.

Shrinking Violet

Jim - thanks for that!  Like I said - it all got me thinking, hence my words of caution - no more, no less.

You obviously have a lot more knowledge than I (and, presumably, GG) so I'd be interested to look at your thesis some time.  Assuming of course that I could get to grips with it! 

(No - not a sarcastic reference or a criticism - honestly, I would value extra info on the subject)

btw I live in a village that had a new road/housing development. recently.  "They" decided that a "wildflower" planting would enhance the village.  But they actually meant (or the Orchard Committee meant, but no-one else seemed to understand) a seed mix of wildflowers and annuals, to prolong the flowering season.  But they (committee, council and all other numpties) didn't seem to comprehend that such planting required quite a bit of annual maintenance, the use of chemicals on a grand scale and that it was not entirely suitable for the location.

Today we have vast weed verges, a few unloved apple seedlings (hence the Orchard committee's involvement) and no-one taking responsibility for what is a total mess. 

(Perhaps now you see my concern about "wild flower planting" without proper understanding etc.  And I don't claim proper understanding!)

nutcutlet

The mix mentioned will grow if it's thrown on the garden which is what most people will be doing. 

A good journalist can write about anything but will lack the in-depth knowledge.

It's fairly complex til you get the hang of it. Differentiating between the types of meadow is a good start

flowering rose

I think if you leave your garden unattended  it will find you those wild flowers that will grow in your garden commonly known as weeds. To grow wild flowers successfully is hard if you have not got the land as it will look a mess otherwise .

Jim Macd

The wild flowers will only find their way into your garden if they're there locally, if not then the only way they can get to your garden is if you put them there. I really wouldn't want to wait for chance, you might be waiting an awfully long time. By the way,a weed is simply a plant in the wrong place and what are commonly known as weed are still pretty much weeds in parts of my garden if not all of my garden. I'm sure nut has a good list of those.

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nutcutlet

I have a fine collection of weeds. 

You're right Jim, along wait for some that grow very well indeed, cowslips, primroses dog daisies and knapweeds. The surrounding agricultural desert only allows cereals, rape and beet to survive

Fishy65

Corn-cockle (agrostemma githago) and corn flower (centaurea cyanus) are two of the wild seeds included in the seed pack and both thrive in my garden since being introduced.The former went unidentified by myself for a few years until some very kind and knowledgeable members ID'd it for me 

Jim Macd
nutcutlet wrote (see)

I have a fine collection of weeds. 

 

Prizewinning. I'm sure.

Fishy65

Agricultural desert is exactly right nutcutlet.Not far from where I live,we have a collection of meadows where skylarks abound among the rich variety of wild grasses.But go to the furthest edge and you reach a barbed wire fence over which is a wheat field.The wheat field contains wheat...and that's it.To wildlife it may as well be concreted,all you can see is an ocean of uniform green.If us gardeners can set aside even just a couple of square yards to go wild,the accumulative effect and benefits would be huge.

nutcutlet
Jim Macd wrote (see)
nutcutlet wrote (see)

I have a fine collection of weeds. 

 

Prizewinning. I'm sure.

 

 

Thinking of applying for National Collection status Jim