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12 messages
03/07/2013 at 12:25

I've got a few photos here of various plants that I've been unable to identify.


Plant 1. This is growing in several display pots so presumably it was something we planted at some point. One of them went to seed and then died, and I found the seeds germinating when clearing out pots and now have two little baby ones growing seperately, so it would be grand to know what it is.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26651.jpg?width=342&height=350&mode=max

 
Plant 2. This is some sort of tree that has been growing in this pot for a long old time. I am told it was removed from the hedge of someone who died 12 years ago! It's been through some tough times but is still going, so I dread to think how big it'd be if it had the run of the earth. I focused on the leaves, but you can see a stem on the right going to the top corner.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26652.jpg?width=431&height=350&mode=max

 
Plant 3. A neighbour has this as a segment of their hedge and a cutting was taken a year or two ago.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26650.jpg?width=427&height=350&mode=max

 

Plant 4. This is our pot of who-knows-what, featuring hundreds of seedlings of plant 1, and this pretty thing. Presumably it revived itself from last year, since it's very central, but again, not sure what it could be. I'd say it was a fuchsia but I don't recall ever seeing one in this pot, and the fuchsias in our garden don't have such pronounced veins.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26649.jpg?width=631&height=350&mode=max

 
Plant 5. Finally we have a seedling that appeared in a pot of nectaroscordum siculum seeds. It is the only plant to make an appearance in that pot but I'm fairly certain it is not what it claims to be! It germinated in the greenhouse and has since been potted on. (Featuring feet of cat who follows me everywhere.)

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26648.jpg?width=355&height=350&mode=max

 
I'm looking forward to hopefully finding out what these fellows are, although I appreciate leaves may not be enough to go on and I may just have to be patient! 

03/07/2013 at 12:28

3 snowberry.  4 fuchsia.

03/07/2013 at 13:07

I have one too. Any help would be much appreciated. What is this ..... 

 

http://twitter.com/Inky_Trace/status/352397923805433858/photo/1

03/07/2013 at 13:22

Red Dahlia, I can help you with that one! That's Yellow Loosestrife. We have it as well and it's a real beauty, and pops up everywhere. We have some between paving slabs!

 

Not sure it's a Snowberry fidgetbones (though that would be lovely!) I got more info from the cutting taker and she said it has tiny bunches of white flowers like an alyssum's.

03/07/2013 at 13:55

Spirea arguta has toothed leaves and white flowers.

03/07/2013 at 16:57

Panoply - thanks, it's my farthers and he was given a clump and since others have asked what it is but we were clueless! Thanks 

03/07/2013 at 20:58

Hello, thanks for the id of no 3 snowberry. I inherited this one and often wondered what it was.

It's on the border of the garden but I find it invasive as it pops up in the beds and is almost impossible to pull out. Don't think it has any useful purpose for nature, so I would be careful of where you plant it.

 

 

 

03/07/2013 at 21:12

I'm still unconvinced about plant 3. My cutting taker took a walk past the neighbour's hedge this afternoon and swiped another piece. Seems it has just finished flowering. Photographed with a two pence piece to give some perspective, though the mature hedge's leaves are slightly smaller than those of our cutting. The three points on the tip of the leaves aren't matching with the snowberry or the Spriaea, as far as I see.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26692.jpg?width=338&height=350&mode=max

 

I should also add that plant 5 is certainly a weed as today I have noticed it in various places around the garden, often near to where we feed the birds. Still no idea what it is though. 

03/07/2013 at 21:32

I agree with Fidgetbones, no.3 looks like Spiraea, I've been pulling out snowberry from  a customers garden over the past few weeks and it doesn't look the same as pic no.3.

04/07/2013 at 07:32

I take it back, fidgetbones and PaulaH, it is spiraea isn't it. I had a good look through all the types, and whilst some look nothing like it, there are a couple of candidates that look right. I think it's probably either Spiraea canescens or Spiraea crenata. In searching you have also helped me identify another plant that's lived in the garden unnamed for over 20 years, that I was waiting to flower to ask you about - Spiraea douglasii. Thank you!!

 

Anyone got any ideas about the others?

04/07/2013 at 11:23

Once upon a time this plant started life in a pot and produced pink roses. Transferred to a garden border and for three years at least has flowered as shown with two colours, plus what appear to be different blooms. Can anybody provide a clue as to what has occurred, or a name ?

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/26718.jpg?width=384&height=350&mode=max

 

04/07/2013 at 17:57

It has probably produced suckers and the white one is growing from the wild rose root below the graft. Suckers should be pulled off when young or cut off. They will weaken the plant.

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