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14/04/2014 at 18:00

I have recently ordered (Bowden's) around 25 varieties of Hostas which range from small to huge in terms of dimensions. I have planted them all in potts and am listing below all the varieties I have. I have done a bit of research on the internet and have read advice that suggests that some hostas prefer more of a sunny position than others. In fact some hostas will develop better in a sunny position. However I have no idea which of my hostas require a sunny position and which a shadier one. I thought to ask here in the hope that collective wisdom may be able to help. I have a front garden which is North to North-West facing and gets around 3-4 hours sunshine from April to October between 2pm - 7pm). I also have a South facing back garden which gets sunshine throughout the day (More specifically: the east facing wall in the morning, The West facing wall in the afternoon and the back wall throughout).I have about 50 medium and large pots planted with hostas so there's plenty to split between both gardens depending on their sun or shade needs. The pots have been filled with a mixture of peat free soil and compost (topped up with crushed egg shells, slug pellets and covered above with large holed chicken wire )

The hosta varieties are:

Big Daddy

Devon Green

Diana Remembered

First Frost

Mack the Knife

Limefizz

Little red joy

Lacey Belle

Purple Heart

George Smith

Gypsy Rose

June

Kiwi Full Monty

Lakeside Cha Cha

Patriot

Paul's Glory

Rubies and Ruffles

Snowden

Spartan Arrow

Mayan Moon

His Honor

Sum of All

Red Stepper

Mango Tango

14/04/2014 at 18:40

I would ask the seller about the best locations; after all if they are selling such a huge variety, they should have some expertise

14/04/2014 at 20:50

as a general rule, if it's a white variegation, they prefer more shade then the yellow variegated varieties. Other factors play their part, e.g. soil moisture content and which time of day they get the sun.

I'm very jealous of your collection BTW. I've only got  6 if those varieties. I need to go shopping.

15/04/2014 at 23:41

I've sent Bowden's an email asking for some advice and hopefully they'll reply soon. Meanwhile I am not taking any risks and am avoiding placing the hostas in the areas of the garden that get 1 hour or less sun per day. As a matter of fact I am also thinking of removing my ferns from deep shade as well.

Hostafan1 thank you for the advice. I suppose I will have to wait for about a year or two before I can see the whole collection in full glory.

16/04/2014 at 18:43

In case this helps anyone else I have pasted here the reply that those kind people at Bowden's provided:

I have separated the hostas into three for how much shade they would prefer, all hostas will grow perfectly happily in Neutral to slightly acidic soil but nothing extra needs to be added to the soil as they will grow well as long as they get plenty of water during the growing season.

Shady area hostas
Big Daddy
Devon Green
First Frost
Mack the Knife
Lacey Belle
Gypsy Rose
Kiwi Full Monty
Snowden

Part Shade area hostas
Diana Remembered
Lime Fizz
June
Lakeside Cha Cha
Patriot
Pauls Glory
Rubies and Ruffles
Spartan Arrow
Mayan Moon
His Honor
Mango Tango

Full sun/part shade area hostas
Little Red Joy
George Smith
Sum of All
Red Stepper

 

I'm assuming by 'shady area' they mean full shade places where there is less than an hour or no direct sunshine at all. However I have also asked the question to clarify.

16/04/2014 at 19:10

Good advice there.  For me white leaves and yellow leaves need some shade from hot sun.  Hostas  like Patriot do well in sun for me but it's trial and error initially.  

19/04/2014 at 23:08

That's an impressive collection!

I hope you've set April/May 2017 aside for hosta dividing duty. With that many you'll have little time for anything else

 

20/04/2014 at 20:53

Thank you Bob. I tend to have this tendency of "have it all or not at all" if that makes sense (my wallet sure hates me for it). Plus Bowden's 20 varieties for £70 offer made sense.

I have planted the different varieties in large enough pots that hopefully they may not need to be divided for about 5 years. The large and huge varieties have been planted in 35L+ pots, the medium ones in 30cm pots and the small ones in 2litre pots.

Next year I may need to repot some of the medium hostas that were planted in small pots I think but will wait to see how they grow this year first.

The hostas have just started to come out (in different stages) and so far I have been lucky (touch wood) and not noticed any slugs or snails. The pots have been nicely salted with slug pellets as well. Also since I have a bit of a "neighbour's cat pooping in my garden" problem I have covered the medium and large pots with chicken wire (which stands above them like a small dome) and have cut a whole in the middle to allow the hostas to shoot up. I have also a lot of crushed egg shells on standby and some coarse sand to spread around the base of each pot.

Considering there's 50 pots of hostas in a few years time I should have plenty to share with members here in the forum as well as to start experimenting with planting in the ground in a corner of my garden.

21/04/2014 at 10:17

Good luck with your collection greenlove. My top tip for slug control is to feed the blackbirds and thrushes,( and dissuade the cat) by sprinkling " suet" bird treats around.The birds will then forage and find the slug/ snails as they go.

I have around 300 hostas of around 80 varieties ( one day I'll properly count them ) but I'm always looking for more.

21/04/2014 at 10:18

Bowdens nursery is about 20 miles from me: dare I visit?

21/04/2014 at 10:31

Ha ha.  I'm sure you will Hostafan.  

Mind you, the national dahlia collections only 5 or 6 miles from me and yet I only visited last year for first time.

21/04/2014 at 16:51

Hostafan, thank you and WOW. 80 varieties, now that is definitely a collection to be proud of. You need to start a swap shop

 

I would order more from Bowden's but I dont want to end up with the same 20 varieties again. So I might give them a call next year and ask if they would consider sending me 20 different varieties from what I got this time.

If Bowden's are 20 miles away from you then I'm sure you will not resist the temptation for long. If not anything else just the sight of all those different varieties of Hostas will be magnificent (although I suppose you only need to look in your garden for that).

Your garden must be magnificent. Post a picture sometime if you get a chance.

21/04/2014 at 17:05

One of my favourite sights in the garden is seeing the hostas come up. This one always has beautiful purple sprouts (ermm, I'm sure thats not the right term but I hope you know what I mean!?)...

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/42916.jpg?width=360&height=350&mode=max

 

21/04/2014 at 17:44

Dito Tootles. It's also one of my favourite moments in the garden and I greedily count the number of emerging shoots because I'm a huge fan of hostas.

21/04/2014 at 20:12

Here's some pics of the new shoots:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/42932.jpg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/42934.jpg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/42935.jpg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/42936.jpg?width=276&height=350&mode=max

 

21/04/2014 at 20:15

There are about 10 or so hostas that still have produced any shoots but I'm assuming it has something to do with the fact that they were planted only a week ago.

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