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15/08/2012 at 22:39

i had 36 perennial plugs two months ago and have gradually put them into bigger pots as needed. as i am new to this , do i keep putting them into bigger pots till next year? i only have a shed with a little window. should i build a cold frame before winter or can you suggest what i do with them. they have been like my babbies and i really look after them

 

15/08/2012 at 22:50
Alflemoon. I would keep them in the pots you have now but cover with fleece when colder weather comes in winter. Do you live in mild area? It's not good practice to pot up for winter because you simply want them to keep alive. She'd isn't really good idea. Watch them over winter to make sure they don't dry out totally though ESP during mild spells. You would not pot on again until spring. Hey alfiemoon, I'm watching a recording of eastenders at mo.....you are doing well to run queen vic and do gardening. Oh, the fleece is known as horticultural fleece, cheap and effective
15/08/2012 at 22:52

I've just started potting mine on for the 2nd time from 2.5 inch pots to 5 inch, they'll stay in these ones until spring next year. I haven't over-wintered any plants before (apart from a chilli my aunt oddly decided to sow in October), but I have a cold frame where they will hopefully be ok during the winter.

There are plenty of places you can cheaply buy a coldframe from, at this time of year  they will probably be on special offer too.

Good luck with your plants.

16/08/2012 at 10:47

Hello, I've been potting mine on gradually into bigger pots.

These are couple of pics of the foxgloves & dephiniums taken about a week ago.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/10869.jpg?width=307&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/10870.jpg?width=307&height=350&mode=max

 I planted the foxgloves out now........they were strong and healthy about the same size as others in the garden. The delphs have grown, will see how they big they get before I decide to plant out or over winter. Same goes for the others.

If you decided to over winter them, I would build yourself a cold frame, the shed probably wont have enough light.

16/08/2012 at 12:38

I received mine in July and some are still a bit small, but like Hollie-hock I have planted my foxgloves out now. The rain has ensured that they are well watered in! I'm hoping to do ths same with the most of rest during the next month or so, rather than have to look after them in pots all winter. Also, if they did get too big for pots during the winter, I  wouldn't want to plant them out in cold weather. I do have a plastic mini-greenhouse so if necessary I can leave some of the smaller ones in there over the winter, although I'm hoping not to have to do this.

16/08/2012 at 13:00
Just to clarify. I get the impression that alfiemoon.'s plants are very small. If they are of 1 litre size or more, and if they are hardy, then yes I would plant them now. I have several plants in 1 litre pots or more that I am unsure about re their hardyness or I am preparing a new site for. Very small plants will prob be lost, one way or another, during the winter if planted out now. Much better to hold back and plant out in the spring when they are eager to grow fast
16/08/2012 at 18:45

I got a really cheap cold frame from Amazon, it's one with the corrugated plastic,it came as a flat-pack and was relatively easy to build.  I have it on a sheltered area of the patio, and so far it's not been blown about (although it might have been if it wasn't in a sheltered area, it's not that heavy).

It was only about £20-30, but I'm a cheapskate and also addicted to land rovers, so money is always tight.  This was a bargain, and allowed me to start some seeds earlier than I would normally have.  The downside was it was so overcrowded due to our late summer!

16/08/2012 at 19:21

I have 2 coldframes which were homemade- I wouldn't be without them. I agree with MMP, the amount of plants you are grow in them  is amazing, all of my plants are grown in them. The delphs in the pictures are in one of the frames- just for protection as they were getting a bit eaten by slugs left out.

I share Green Magpies views on planting them out. I think I will probably end up over wintering  the Geums, Lavenders and the one surviving Echnichea as they are still small and not showing any signs of being pot bound yet. The Foxgloves were ready to go in and I think my Delphs will be in the Autumn. 

When you plant them out depends on how the plant is performing, if it has a good established root system  and good growth then I think it's best to get them in the ground.

 

17/08/2012 at 09:09

I was reassured to hear on GW that penstemons (which I know nothing about) are disliked by slugs and snails and safe from attack, so at least that's one hazard they're safe from. Some of the slugs around my compost heap are bigger than most of the plug plants at the moment.

I'd expect lavenders to over-winter OK - I have some very small ones in the border that have been there since last year, they seem quite hardy. I'm still not sure about the rest.

17/08/2012 at 12:50
I have just put in a lavender hedge but thelants were in 1 litre pots and excellent size. They were also outside and acclimatised when I got them. They are growing away beautifully after 2 weeks. However, if they were small, say in 9 cm pots, I think I would lose some of them even here in the s.w. so would not plant those out. Snails will eat penstemon flowers when going over but dead heading will counter that.
15/09/2012 at 21:05

 I received all my plants at the end of May and they are now all in ground. they all have done really well-  a couple of the delphs have flowerbuds developing

09/10/2013 at 21:38

Will plug plants that are overwintered inside on a windowsill retain the foilage or will they still die back?

09/10/2013 at 21:57

Arioch, depends on what plants they are.  Mostly they do die back.  How small are they?  And ??ou don't want them too warm either. Away from frost, yes, but need to be cool. ,they shouldn't be encouraged to grow now just to tick over with v little water 

09/10/2013 at 22:18

Thank for the reply.

The plants are:

Lavender (Evergreen)

Dianthus (Evergreen)

Geum - Growing well in 9cm pots

Foxglove - Growing well in 9cm pots

Aquilegia - Growing well in 7cm pots

Heuchera - Small plants in 7cm pots

Delphinium - Small plants in 7cm pots

Echinacea - Struggling in 7cm pots

Coreopsis - Growing well in 7cm pots

Eryngium - Small plants in 7cm pots

Leucanthemum - Growing well in 7cm pots

Campanula - Growing well in 7cm pots

Hope this helps

 

 

09/10/2013 at 22:24

A tip I got from and old gardener was to put the pots into the soil. I stops them from freezing if no cold frame is owned.

09/10/2013 at 22:32

Some of those would be OK in a sheltered corner outside but I think a cold frame would be a good investment if you can afford it. As Dave suggests and a cold frame would be really good. They'll be really soft, weak and leggy by spring indoors. Out in a coldframe you can get them opened up on good days through the winter and get them planted out much sooner in the sping.

I think the foxgloves could be planted out

09/10/2013 at 22:51

Thank you for the replies.

Looks like I will be purchasing a cold frame.

Trying to be a skin flint & thought they would be ok inside in an unheated room.

10/10/2013 at 09:09

Cold frame good idea Arioch.  Best to keep open durimg relatively mild spells.  You want to grow hard and keep cool.....not cold.  Echinaceas often do struggle...they are so variable ranging from fairly hardy to very tender and they are susceptible to various pathogens ironically caused by being too warm in winter.  So,??ou cant win   Some survive for me and others disappear (I grow many of the new varieties so it's trial and error....I will leave some in the ground and some potted up in the GH)

10/10/2013 at 09:36

Cold frames are great Arioch, you can do so much in them. Mine are homemade and not the traditional on the floor types, more like sturdier and stronger mini greenhouses. They have shelves so can accomadate seeds trays as well as young plants and you can use them to harden plants off as well

I would have thought the foxgloves would be fine to go in the ground, I'd probably plant the geums out as well if they've got a good root system. Echinaceas very hit and miss for me.....got one sown from seed earlier this year, still alive so will try and nuture this one for next year

10/10/2013 at 09:59

i hae two coldframes made from old greenhouse.. the old windows are sliding and tilting roof and the slatted one is fixed air vent.. wouldnt be without them as said.. they are great for protecting all plants from the harsh winter winds and frost that dont really need the warmth of a greenhouse..

i have got some of my seeds that i did i the swap growing now in the freenhouse.. i do hope they survive the winter.. they are in 2in high paper homemade pots.. which makes it easier to pot up as it doenst disturb the roots.. and the ppaper degrades in teh ground.. perfect..

 

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