9 messages
25/04/2014 at 07:28

I have a tree that has self seeded next to a big cherry tree and two buddlias. Should it stay or should it go?

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/43419.jpg?width=648&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/43420.jpg?width=648&height=350&mode=max

 

25/04/2014 at 07:32

It looks like a rowan to me - good for wildlife - the birds love the berries (which is probably how it came to be where it is).  Worth keeping - if it's not in the best place for it (and it does look a mite close to that fence) I'd move it in the autumn when it's dormant.  

25/04/2014 at 07:50

Are the berries poisonous to dogs? 

25/04/2014 at 08:08

There's lots of conflicting statements on the net.  

Rowan berries are used to make jellies for human consumption.  They are not eaten raw by humans as they taste acrid and like many berries can cause stomach upsets if eaten raw.

The majority of rowan berries are eaten by wild birds.   

In my experience I have never known a dog to eat rowan berries (and I've had many rowan trees and many greedy dogs).  There are lots of plants and berries that could cause stomach upsets to dogs if they ate a large amount of them, but because they taste unpleasant dogs don't eat them. 

 

25/04/2014 at 08:15

Thank you. I think I will keep and move when dormant.

25/04/2014 at 08:28

Yup the Rowan or Mountain Ash,it looks beautiful.

25/04/2014 at 10:06

They are lovely trees. Proper 3 season interest; folwers, fruit, nice mid-green leaves and autumn colour.

25/04/2014 at 10:19

looks like an ash tree to me- if so- get rid pronto

25/04/2014 at 10:31

The picture is not of an ash tree - rowans are sometimes mistaken for ash trees but the difference is quite marked - rowan or sorbus acuparia leaves grow alternately up the stem, whereas the English ash fraxinus acuparia has leaves which grow in pairs opposite each other.

NB.  this refers to the leaves, not the leaflets. 

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