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Two plants seen in our local park yesterday.  Can you help us to identify them please?  Photos 1 & 2 are the same plant, 3 & 4 are another plant.

Thank you.

Also a dead tree trunk with some interesting fungi.

Last edited: 20 March 2017 20:14:11

nutcutlet

Berberis darwinii

Eleagnus x ebbingeii

No good at fungi 

Goodness that was quick nut. The flowers on the Berberis look lovely when open - almost mini daffodil style.  It was the mass of berries on the Eleagnus that amazed me - I have never seen them before. Thanks so much.

They have adopted a new strategy in the park of leaving the dead tree trunks lying around to rot naturally.  There have been quite a few storm damaged trees in recent years, the fungi and insects love this natural approach.

nutcutlet

I love to see it all left about and 'melting down' Much better for wildlife. I put a link to this thread on another one about berries on eleagnus

punkdoc

Love that fallen trunk, I have several hanging around from tree felling and storm damage, and over time they become a habitat for many fungi and other beasts.

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Yes, we have started to do that in a miniature way - plenty of pine bark has been piled up, making a habitat for hedgehogs as well as smaller insects, the birds like it too. The pile is in a quiet area of the garden that won't be disturbed by us.

Edd

Difficult to see what the fungus is but I would take a guess at. 

Dacrymyces palmatus. Orange Jelly Fungus, Witch’s Butter. I would like to think it was the start of Chicken of the woods (very edible) but it does not look right and I would need a closer pick.

The other is a bracket fungus (or shelf fungi) perhaps rainbow if you are lucky but it could be any comprised bracket as there are numerous species of the Polypore Family.

Last edited: 21 March 2017 02:36:09

Edd

Sorry. I got wrong for this before.

Please do not eat any mushrooms or fungi as Laetiporus sulphureus can harm certain people as it is a natural source of vitamin D and you might overdose if eaten in the wrong quantities.

This applies to any mushroom. Never put them in the sun and dry them for vitamin D use during winter months. 

Chrissy the gardener

I have never looked closely at Berberis but having seen your pictures I will now do so, it is really beautiful and like you pointed out just like small daffodil blooms.

Don't worry Edd, we had no intention to eat the fungus, although we enjoyed looking at the formations.  However, for a park that is full of children should it be encouraged to grow?

My children never, ever looked interested in eating anything growing in the garden, unless we allowed them to (i.e. fresh fruit), but not all children are so sensible or restrained, and perhaps dogs too may be interested in a nibble.

Yes Chrissy the gardener, the Berberis flowers are lovely.  The shrubs also grow as part of a hedge in our own garden, and although small and fairly insignificant they are evergreen, which we like, and grow quite dense, thickening up after a couple of years of growth.

Edd
Guernsey Donkey2 says:

Don't worry Edd, we had no intention to eat the fungus, although we enjoyed looking at the formations.  However, for a park that is full of children should it be encouraged to grow?

See original post
Try and stop it Guernsey Donkey2. Its there to be eaten.
 

 

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