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9 messages
23/09/2012 at 08:57

I have some lupins in 5" pots (23/9/12) growing quite strongly outdoors.Should I plant them out into the garden at this time of year (NE Scotland) or keep them in the pots outdoors or put them into the greenhouse over winter? Thanks.

John

23/09/2012 at 09:12
Hiya John. This is something I have learned over the years, eventually. Lupins that have been established in the garden are truly hardy. Cuttings, etc I take during the summer usually are pretty tough too. New plants, even in 5" pots are not nearly as hardy, even for me in Cornwall. They always suffer and often prevents flowering. So, from this experience......and to be sure plants will,survive...take them into greenhouse or have fleece handy for cold months.
23/09/2012 at 09:35

Thanks Christopher - I thought it would be a bit too cold up here!

23/09/2012 at 12:08

And inspect around pots etc  for marauding snails!!!

23/09/2012 at 13:31

Yes, I agree - in a greenhouse over winter. And make sure that they are good-sized plants when you put them out, and protect from slugs and snails.

23/09/2012 at 14:09

I'd like to know the secret to growing lupins.  I've tried them in the ground in various parts of my garden and they just don't survive, let alone thrive.  This year I tried again in a pot and those curled up their toes too.

I have very fertile, alkaline to neutral loam and very hard tap water.  Do they need acidity?  Better drainage?  What?  All advice welcome as I plan to try again from seed next spring before giving up.

23/09/2012 at 15:34

I have some young lupins which I now plant out in tubs surrounded by slug defence.They have done better in pots as my soil is heavy(clay) and been unsuccessful in keeping them but in the pots they are doing fine,they will die back and hopefully flower next year.They are a  biannual so take two years before flowering.

23/09/2012 at 15:49
Obelixx I think I know what you mean about acidity. I grow,lupins in different parts of,the garden but in my ex veg plot they get chlorotic......yellowing leaves and less vigorous growth. I sprayed with sequestered iron and they recover and,thrive. However, they grow better elsewhere in my sandy loam. Soft water too, I think. For me they are best in their second year if you want big plants and lots of spikes but I split some every year after flowering.. I think very fertile soil is not so good and stand to be corrected but I do grow good lupins
23/09/2012 at 18:33

Thanks FR and Chris. I have a well drained, sunny patch on the side front which is more neutral then the rest of the garden and may prove to be a better home.  I'll try them there and not water them after planting.

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