Start a new thread

1 to 14 of 14 replies

Andrew Rimmer



I didn't see the flowers. The seeds are small and black


Shrinking Violet

Ummmm - pretty difficult to identify from leaf and seed pods alone.  Plants are categorised by their flowers, so it makes this quite hard.  I think that I would make sure that it didn't self-seed (in case it's a thug) and save the seed to grow in pots to see what happens.  You never know - it may be something quite special!

(There may be someone out there, however, who is cleverer than I and will be able to help you.)

Probably welsh poppy - meconpsis cambrica. Once you have it, they will pop up everywhere.
Andrew Rimmer

Wow you guys are fast.


Thanks so much for your replies. I've just got an allotment so my interest in all things of nature has increased a lot. I've kept the seeds and I'll plant in a pot next year.

It looks as though some of the seeds may already have been distributed!


Well at least you know what it looks like now...believe me, no need to save seed!

I love these simple poppy flowers.    I have them in my garden, more and more each year, both in yellow and a few in orange.   I have never planted them, they just arrived.   I agree with Figrat - definitely no need to sow seeds!

Alina W

In fact, it might be an idea to deadhead them in future, or they grow to pest proportions quite rapidly. They are perennial, with a thick taproot, and will re-grow from any scrap of root.

Weed fairy

Welsh poppies - meconopsis cambrica. once you have them they will take over which is lovely if all you have are weeds. V hard to control.


Hmmmm I spotted these for the first time this year on a path I walk down to work, I absolutely fell in love with it, the yellow flower I thought was stunning.  Once the flowers died back I picked the seeds pods to plant in my garden - wondering if I should now

Well they are pretty flowers! An easy way to limit their profligate habits is, just as they're running to seed, grasp the whole plant, leaves and all, then with a sharp twist, yank the whole thing out. It won't get rid of the deep taproot, new foliage will soon come in to fill the gap. Wouldn't recommend composting the seed heads either. They are easy to remove when small, but more of a challenge when established.

Isn't it interesting how some people cannot grow plants that most people regard as virtually weeds?  I have never, ever been able to get welsh poppy to settle here - though I did eventually get lily of the valley to get going.  japanese anemones grow, but do not spread, unlike oregano which in its various guises is absolutely everywhere, along with hardy geraniums!

Moonlit Hare

They look a little like the yellow poppies in my garden which just keep going and going and going!!!!!

Sign up or log in to post a reply