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20 messages
13/12/2013 at 11:47

Does anyone have seeds / plants of Pulmonaria obscura or know of a source. B&T world seeds list it but they don't have stock, however I would prefer to find a British source if possible rather than European.

Thanks in advance.

13/12/2013 at 15:49

I've never seen that one Jim

13/12/2013 at 17:31

I suppose it's specific name is more apt that I'd hoped. it's common name is Suffolk Lungwort. So fingers crossed it may be a little less obscure there and with even more luck someone will have some seed or plants. I can't believe such a beautiful, small,woodland plant is so hard to get hold of. The two main suppliers I normally use don't do either native species, one of them does P. officinalis which is introduced. No wonder it's rare if nobody sells it.

13/12/2013 at 17:45
13/12/2013 at 17:51

If you do find any for sale let me know 

I'm much closer to Suffolk than you and I don't know this one at all

13/12/2013 at 18:12

It's extremely rare (Red Data Book) so I'm not surprised seeds are not available. Is the rarity the reason you want to grow it, Jim? The only real difference from P.officinalis is in the unspotted leaves, and the leaves are usually the main attraction (at least in my opinion!).

13/12/2013 at 18:21

I like to have the natives landgirl. Common sense tells me that anything that eats P. obscura can cope with P. officinalis. If it can't it's likely to be extinct already. 

But I love my native flowers

13/12/2013 at 18:27

It is listed on the Red List as having only 600 individuals over just 3 locations so it's not surprising you don't know it. I find it really frustrating when things are so rare that more isn't done to ensure their survival and surely you couldn't do more than make plants available through micropropagation or just cuttings. It will become less rare if people like us are happy to take on custodianship of some plants. Okay they won't be 'wild' anymore but at least they'll have less chance of going extinct, and better that than have non-native plants being imported.

13/12/2013 at 18:30

Thanks for the links by the way, I did know about that, I found a later mention of a visit. 

13/12/2013 at 18:33

There isn't any 'wild' left round here. Agricultural desert land and gravel pits.

I like to think if I keep the wild plants here I can re-populate after the gravel extraction is over. In theory after the latest extraction is finished there'll be a wildlife area right on my boundary. I hope I live long enough to see it happen 

13/12/2013 at 18:33
landgirl100 wrote (see)

It's extremely rare (Red Data Book) so I'm not surprised seeds are not available. Is the rarity the reason you want to grow it, Jim? The only real difference from P.officinalis is in the unspotted leaves, and the leaves are usually the main attraction (at least in my opinion!).

No, not at all, I'd still want it if it were as common as a daisy, I'd just not have to be looking for it. but P. officinalis and spotless forms. I have it, it gets huge. I'll see if I can find a photo I took. 

 

13/12/2013 at 18:41

Here is one in winter without the big lanceolate leaves which reach 2 feet high.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/35109.jpg?width=544&height=350&mode=max

 

13/12/2013 at 18:42

If you want a spotless that you can get hold of Jim there's P. rubra. (as long as you don't get the ghastly variegated version). Very early flowering and good for early bumble bees

13/12/2013 at 18:54

To be honest, nut I like to think I'm creating as diverse a habitat as possible so I want to pack in as many natives as I can. There's still room for hard working non-natives, but I would like to think I've done something to help our British flora (and fauna) not go extinct. I know it's a pipe dream but what a good one? I'm very torn between the two camps, one that says 'You should only grow it if it's local' and those that say, 'Better to have non-local growing than nothing growing at all, as long as something is eating it then it deserves a home.'

13/12/2013 at 19:05

I like to keep a diverse habitat as well Jim.  If I see something being eaten I'll plant more of it for next year

19/12/2013 at 14:20

 

Here's another native pulmonaria Nut, this is P. longifolia. Mine just arrived from Binny in Scotland.

http://www.robsplants.com/images/portrait/PulmonariaLongifolia080427b.jpg

 

19/12/2013 at 14:37

That is a lovely blue

20/12/2013 at 11:16

 That's what I thought and lots more early pollen and nectar.

20/12/2013 at 11:22

Is this a very early flowerer. P. rubra often has one or new on New Year's Day if the weather has been mild like this year.

I shall have to get some longifolia though

21/12/2013 at 11:30

Hi Nut that's my understanding too, my officinalis were flowering at new year last year and they look like they're going to do the same this year. The longifolia is showing no signs of doing that but they're fairly young plants so that may change. This is the first year my seed sown officinalis are going to flower. I thought I'd lost them all until early this year they all started pushing up those sail like leaves. It took me a while to work out what they were as I'm sure they were nowhere to be seen the year before. 

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