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10 messages
04/05/2014 at 12:34

I have 140 feet of north-facing larch lap fence which needs planting against with shrubs or hardy perennials. The ground is further shaded by trees growing on the other side of the fence which creates heavy shade where I want to plant.

If anyone has successfully grown anything in these conditions I'd be grateful for some advice on what to plant.

Thanks

04/05/2014 at 13:39

Sarcococca is good in shade and smells nice in winter.

Cornus mas seems to be coping as shade has overtaken it.

Choisya does surprisingly well in shade. Euonymous fortunei in all its many varieties.

Hazels are good.

 ferns, hostas, aquilegias, foxgloves, pulmonarias, dicentras, some of the  hardy geraniums, epimediums. 

Will that do for a start. I'm sure there'll be more suggestions

Lyn
04/05/2014 at 13:42

Hydraengas do well, i have a long row facing north and they are fantastic every year.

04/05/2014 at 13:56

solomon's seal

04/05/2014 at 14:00
Vinca and ivy are both good for ground cover in shade.
04/05/2014 at 14:21

Clematis montana will grow up in shade, then dance along the top of the fence.  Russian vine will grow anywhere, but you have to be sure you really want it as it grows very large very quickly. 

04/05/2014 at 15:09

Euphorbia (wood spurge). I have this growing in almost complete shade under my red robin and flowering red currant.It loves the shade and is a woodland plant by nature (hence the name) 

05/05/2014 at 07:04

Hi

Two native shrubs that cope with heavy shade are Spurge laurel [Daphne laureola] and butchers broom, [Ruscus aculeatus], neither is particularly ornamental though they are evergreen and they keep to manageable size.

05/05/2014 at 16:19

Thanks. A good selection there. I already have a few hydrangeas from cuttings so I'll try them and there's already ivy there. Perhaps not ideal is weigela, but I have cuttings of those so I might use them - unless anyone knows they're not a good idea. Ideally I'd like native shrubs, but they're less common in garden centres.

I have foxgloves and bluebells already that can move themselves in now the ground has been cleared, but I'd like a few native ferns and other native species that can be left to get on with it. A scattering of woodland flower mixture perhaps.

I can see I'm going to be busy!

05/05/2014 at 16:58
nutcutlet wrote (see)

Sarcococca is good in shade and smells nice in winter.

Cornus mas seems to be coping as shade has overtaken it.

Choisya does surprisingly well in shade. Euonymous fortunei in all its many varieties.

Hazels are good.

 ferns, hostas, aquilegias, foxgloves, pulmonarias, dicentras, some of the  hardy geraniums, epimediums. 

Will that do for a start. I'm sure there'll be more suggestions

 

Ceres wrote (see)
Vinca and ivy are both good for ground cover in shade.

 

Thanks Nutcutlet & Ceres ....

I've got an area like this and have some of the plants you've mentioned. Should look less drab this year.

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