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fidgetbones

I think that was a couple of years back.  Yesterday I found out that what I have always called  Mesembryanthemum criniflorum  is now called .Dorotheanthus bellidiformis

Hostafan1

aw don't say that fidget, that was the first botanical name I ever learned. I was 10 at the time and very pleased with myself.

Obelixx

How come it's never been mentioned before then Fidget.  Haven't spotted it here or on GW or Beechgrove........

That new name for ice plants sounds very unfortunate.

madpenguin

I know I will still call most of my plants 'Sedum' (I collect succulents!) but I am already getting used to some of the new names.I actually correctly identified a Phedimus the other day,quite pleased with myself!!! 

It can still be confusing though:-

Hylotelephium is one of a group of genera that form a separate lineage from Sedum, and is closely related to OrostachysMeterostachys, and SinocrassulaAccording to the Missouri Botanic garden, "Upright Sedums were at one point separated into the genus Hylotelephium, but are now generally included back in the genus Sedum." Kew Garden's online database now lists Hylotelephium as a synonym for Sedum.

Last edited: 11 November 2017 14:53:34

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Dovefromabove

They can change them as much as they like ... I understand the need for change and I applaud their desire for accuracy.

However, at the age of 27 it is highly unlikely that I will remember the new names.

Before I got to 27 I assimilated the geranium/pelargonium change but it seems that the garden centres never did, so I don't suppose it'll matter too much. 

Hostafan1

the sedum name change was a while back.

Autumn Joy became Herbs whatsit about 3 or 4 years ago, then the sedum bit changed too, to hylo whatsit.

Hostafan1

At least when they changed schizostylis to hesperantha it was from a tricky name to an easier name; but sedum autumn joy to Hylotelephium (Herbstfreude Group)!!  I ask you!!!

KeenOnGreen

Not forgetting Symphyotrichum, formerly hard to pronounce Aster.  Rolls off the tongue, eh?

nutcutlet

I used to keep up to date with all this stuff but it moves too fast now (or I move too slow) 

Obelixx

I can see the point of some name changes - especially now I'm gardening in French with their common names to deal with tho, being more collectors than gardeners my new gardening friends trip botanical names with surprising ease and frequency tho still the old ones sometimes.  Persicaria is still polygonum to many of them.   Nor do they call tender geraniums pelargoniums yet.   Their common names are unfathomable to me.  eg Ancolie for aquilegia.

I'm just surprised that this particular change hasn't come up earlier.  Didn't Carol extol the virtues of sedum Autumn Joy on GW recently?  No mention of a botanical name change.

Like you Nut, I can't keep up.

Iamweedy

My mind is boggling. This is ridiculous.

Herbstfreude is just the German way of saying Autumn Joy and I suspect was probably its original name as it is the name given to the group.

Probably angliciised by the nursery trade so as not to put off the customers, like my rose Zigeuner Knabe/Gypsy Boy. The trade doesn't seem to mind French names as much though, plenty of roses with them. Prejudice or what?

Obelixx

I dunno - what about all those German miscanthus and heleniiums.  Butterpat would be a good one for you but I may just have to find some Dunkle Pracht.  Wonderful name.

Papi Jo
Obelixx says:

How come it's never been mentioned before then Fidget.  Haven't spotted it here or on GW or Beechgrove........

That new name for ice plants sounds very unfortunate.

See original post

The botanical name changes have already been discussed on this forum, see e.g. http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/plants/who-knew/1002484.html

I can understand the frustration when a familiar (and easily remembered) taxon name such as aster gets changed for a more obscure name such as symphiotricum. But these changes are scientifically motivated, there are that many and it's worth making the effort of learning them (if you so wish).

Obelixx you make a good point about using the Latin/scientific names for plants when talking plants with gardeners of different languages. The Latin/scientific names are universal, that's their strong point.

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Hostafan1

The other strong point about name changes is that anyone can challenge them. 

It used to be the International plant nomenclature committee based at Kew, but that was a while back so maybe the name or base has changed.

Anyone can put forward a reason why a name needs to change and, if considered to have merit, it'll be looked at.

Fairygirl

I love the name Schizostylus and I'll continue to use it, although I accept your argument that Hesperantha's an easier name Hosta!. 

Sedums will always be sedums here.  However, I love the name Herbstfraude and have always called Autumn Joy that  

Life's too short 

How ironic if the committee's name was changed Hosta....

Papi Jo

I wrote "But these changes are scientifically motivated, there are that many..."

Sorry, that should have been "... there aren't that many".

.

The person or persons who first discover any plant was the person who named it and quite right.

Then came along a bunch of nobodies wanting to make a name for themselves and start on renaming plants which already had been named.

When they go home at night they proudly announce to their BETTER half, darling I have just given a new name to a plant that everyone else had wrongly named!

A bunch of Little Jack Horners, ---- what a good boy am I.

pansyface

I'M NOT CERTAIN, BUT I THINK WHEN PLANTS ARE NAMED AFTER PEOPLE THEY ARE NAMED IN HONOUR OF THAT PERSON BY SOMEONE ELSE AND NOT BY THE PERSON WHO DISCOVERED THEM THEMSELVES.

"IN HONOUR OF" CAN BE A LOOSE DESCRIPTION AS WHEN LINNAEUS NAMED A WEED SIEGESBECKIA AFTER HIS RIVAL.