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Hi all

I have a Twited Hazel which was untill recently been growing in a pot. It's not been doing very well so I decided to plant it out at the weekend.

It's within 6ft from the house and a few feet from a retaining wall, I have been warned that the Hazels roots could be a problem for me. 

Should I replant it back in to a larger pot? will the roots cause an issue?

Thanks in advance for any advice, sorry if I am posting in the wrong forum.

 

Many thanks

Mike 

Haisie

I had a twisted hazel in a pot too and I planted it in the garden, about two years ago. It's just over 4ft tall now and very healthy. It's very pretty and gives me lots of hazel nuts every year. I'm worried now as I didn't think about its roots doing any damage. It's about 7ft away from the house. Oh dear, is this yet another planting mistake I've done? Can't wait for someone who knows to read this... Will get out spade in advance. I'll be upset if I have to move it and possibly kill it.

nutcutlet

Put the spade away, it's not that bad. It you're cutting it back to four feet every year the roots won't be enormous. If you let it go to great heights (that's great in hazel terms, it's not huge) the roots will grow to support it. 

Atilla

Twisted Hazel (corylus avellana Contorta) is normally sold grafted, so make sure that you do not bury above the join. As the roots are grafted onto a less rigourous Hazel species and you do need to prune the tree to keep the twists fresh and not turn into straight branches, the roots are fine and should not damage foundations.

Haisie

Phew, thank you nutcutlet. blairs, I don't prune it at all and it twists itself.

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Dovefromabove

Never known the corkscrews to straighten out - can't see how that's possible 

What can happen is that suckers from the rootstock grow and are not removed, these grow straight as in the ordinary hazel, and they will then 'take over' the shru and dominate.  They should be pruned off or better still pulled down and away from the stock at their base as this will remove the growing point. 

Thats great news. Really didn't want to be digging it up. Thanks for your help

 

 

Atilla
Dovefromabove wrote (see)

Never known the corkscrews to straighten out - can't see how that's possible 

What can happen is that suckers from the rootstock grow and are not removed, these grow straight as in the ordinary hazel, and they will then 'take over' the shru and dominate.  They should be pruned off or better still pulled down and away from the stock at their base as this will remove the growing point. 

Fresh growth is more convulated than the older stems, which thicken and naturally  get less twisted. The colour also fades.

my twisted hazel is so twisted it looks like corkscrews.

admired by many but more are confused and think it needs water .

i always take out the straight growth it works for me.

the ground around the base approx 3 ft away from the base is regularly dug over i have no problem with the roots.

happy twisting

I never have any problems with my Twisted Hazel Ive had it years . I always cut the suckers off and look forward to the leaves falling off so I can see the twisted branches , love it !!!!

I have an old twisted Hazel and the centre of it has matured and the branches are 3-4 inches thick.  Can I cut out the larger stems/branches?  Would the shrub be ok?

So glad to ome across lots of twisted Hazel admirers. Mine has been in a terracotta tub for many years (probably about 15), I guess the tub is around 20/25 inches in diameter. I prune the straight branches as soon as I see them. Being in a tub, it doesn't produce many nuts, a handful each year, but then, that is not why I grow it. It does, however, suffer from scale. This does not seem to reduce the palnt's vigour though, so I tend to leave well alone. Last year it had a spurt of growth and has given me some fressh, bigger and longer, twisty branches to gaze at. I love it when it has a covering of fresh snow, magic.

So pleased to have found this conversation - my twisted hazel has been in a pot for about 5 years and isn't looking too good right now.  I had decided to plant it in my garden but was slightly dubious, now after reading the comments I'm going ahead.  Hoping it will be happy in its new position.

Angela

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thank you all for this have just purchased twisted hazel and about to return to shop as was worried about roots (as it will be planted close to garden wall) but now will happily plant.

Margaret

Yviestevie

Have had a twisted hazel for a number of years, have never noticed any nuts though.  I have moved it once, about 5 years ago.  When do the nuts usually appear?

fidgetbones

The nuts hide among the contorted ends. The squirrels find them before I do, while they are still green.

Yviestevie

 That must be it then fidget, we have squirrels so they must be getting a good feed before I find them.

LesleyK

I think the squirrels are getting a good feed here too Yvie.  Mine is planted in a fairly damp spot down the garden and I have a tall geranium planted very close to it (summer skies) and the twisted stems act as a natural support.  Not intentional - just a happy accident.