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16 messages
26/09/2013 at 15:51

This appeared in the garden in about june. The first clump died down but it has now spread along and up. Good ground cover but I'd like to know what it is.

Fidgetbones - could you reply again as your post about it is lost in the ether

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/31682.jpg?width=400&height=350&mode=max

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/31683.jpg?width=598&height=350&mode=max

 

 

26/09/2013 at 16:29

common fumitory.

26/09/2013 at 18:52

fidget, you amaze me! How do you know all this? Have you and nutcutlet got plant enzyclopedias in your brains?

26/09/2013 at 19:54

Misspent youth. I used to try to identify as many plants as possible and learn the latin names. It led to me buying a lot of books. I have more gardening and plant books than the local library.

 And from diving, I have a lot of fish and marine life identification books as well.

and an advanced certificate in Marine Biology , and A level Biology.

 well, you have to do something on dark winter nights don't you.?

 

26/09/2013 at 21:37

Fumaria officinalis.and would you believe it is related to Poppies?

One of the few plants like this which so far have not been renamed.

27/09/2013 at 09:21

Well fidget, it doesn't seem "misspent" to me, you are a boon to all of us ignormus's! Have learnt a lot from you!

27/09/2013 at 11:16

I too love trying to remember the names of plants but not clever enough to do it in Latin!! Gardening is a wonderful hobby!!!

 

27/09/2013 at 11:31

Its a lot easier than you think. For instance alba means white. Flore plena means a double flower or flower with plenty of petals. So anything described as flore plena alba will have double white flowers.

 Its the same with describing genus, species, cultivar.

 Understanding that  species within a genus will have a lot of common characteristics, means that it is easier to start identifying things by giving a head start when you know which genus you are looking for.

 Most people can identify a rose. If it is (usually)single and comes true from seed it is a species. The  hybrid teas and most of the roses we grow in a garden are cultivars and will not come true from seed.

27/09/2013 at 14:24

Figet , you are impressive! shame they dont teach Latin in schools (unless you go to Eaton or somewhere equally posh Takes me ages to learn the names so I  prefer to use  the common ones!

27/09/2013 at 14:46

I didn't learn Latin at school. I would struggle to conjugate a verb.

There is a little RHS book called" Latin for gardeners."

27/09/2013 at 21:01

And in any case the vast majority of plant names are in almost any other language than Latin.

And most people know far more correct Botanical names than they think.

Cyclamen, Crocus, Chrysanthemum, Cornus, Dianthus, Cotoneaster.....I could name dozens, but won't. All of these are the Latinised names for plants.

27/09/2013 at 21:04

I went to a state school, they tried to teach me latin, I can't conjugate a verb but I can remember the latin names of plants and animals because I know enough latin for them to make sense to me - as Fidget describes. 

27/09/2013 at 21:37
SwissSue wrote (see)

fidget, you amaze me! How do you know all this? Have you and nutcutlet got plant enzyclopedias in your brains?

 

I might have Sue. There's not much else in there so plenty of room

27/09/2013 at 22:35

My nan used to say that a pea in an empty can rattling about made a lot of noise.

I'm sure I don't know what she meant.

27/09/2013 at 23:09

thanks for that info fidgetbones, that explanation certainly makes sense

27/09/2013 at 23:13
fidgetbones wrote (see)

My nan used to say that a pea in an empty can rattling about made a lot of noise.

I'm sure I don't know what she meant.

 

Empty vessels make most noise was what I was told, 'spose that's right.

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