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16 messages
17/02/2014 at 11:43

I have two plastic pots each with 3 hyacinth bulbs sitting partly above the compost.  I got them from a GC when they were in bud and they filled my kitchen with colour and perfume for a good two weeks, but have since gone over and I have cut off the dead flowers.  I would like to put them in the garden at some stage to flower there next spring, but I'm not sure if you can do that with forced bulbs.  If you can, what do I do with them next?  Leave them inside and continue watering them? Or stand the pots outside till the leaves die down, dry them off and plant in the ground in autumn?

Edd
17/02/2014 at 11:51

Monty Don says-

"If your hyacinths have already finished flowering, cut off the flower spikes so they do not put any energy into making seeds. However, leave all the foliage as this will feed next year’s bulbs. Move the pot outside or to a sunny spot and keep watering weekly. A fortnightly feed of liquid seaweed will help the bulb formation. 

When all the foliage has completely died back – which will be at least six weeks after flowering – you can either lift the bulbs from the pot and store them in a dry, dark place ready for repotting next autumn or leave them in the pot, making sure they do not become too wet. 

Although these plants are intended for growing indoors, they will grow perfectly well outside, flowering in March and early April and cheerfully reappearing year after year. "

17/02/2014 at 12:20
I always plant mine into the garden as soon as they have finished flowering, unless it's very frosty, they are very tough & always come up the following spring.
17/02/2014 at 12:47

I do as Mark does - they grow happily outside - just flowering later around the same time as bluebells.  They won't have quite such full flower spikes, but are just as pretty for all that. 

17/02/2014 at 13:02

as above although I did leave some in a pot from last year(keeping it the shed and brought back in dec) and it flowered but they need to go into the ground to flower well next year or new soil.

17/02/2014 at 17:15

I find that it sometimes takes a year or so for them to recover from being forced, but I now have hyacinths in all sorts of places where I have tucked them in after indoor flowering.  Seems awful to throw them out and quite unnecessary too.   It is true that they do flower slightly smaller, but the perfume is just as good, and once they get massed together as they years go on, they look great anyway, smaller or not. 

17/02/2014 at 17:22

Thanks all.  I will follow Monty's advice Edd.

17/02/2014 at 17:27

I like the flowers slightly smaller, they don't fall over like the ones that are forced. I don't mess about, I plant them in the garden as soon as they've finished flowering and let them sort themselves out. Usually a bit deeper than they were in the pot. I'm getting quite a collection now. The cream ones are lovely

17/02/2014 at 19:28

I've grown cream and or white ones indoors all of my life - or I did until I got together with OH and the first year we had them he wheezed and wheezed and I could hear his chest creaking!!

Now I can only grow hyacinths in the garden.  Well, if that's his only fault I'll keep him 

17/02/2014 at 19:53

We are particularly fond of the blue ones as well - interesting that no-one seems to find the pink the best - they were  all that were left in the shops this week!   I expect someone will now say they love the pinks the best - well, someone should. 

17/02/2014 at 20:06

My vote goes with the blue - grew them for the first time this year, but will do it again - luckily no wheezing here. Will plant mine out next weekend, and buy some tete a tetes to fill the container !

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37692.jpg?width=512&height=350&mode=max

 Just to demonstrate Nuts point about the collapsing spikes - they had to be rescued with kebab sticks

18/02/2014 at 09:45

Couldn't resist the challenge I do love the pinks -  but - I also love having a mixture.  And agree with everything already said, I love the way they fill the house with their beautiful scent and then I plant out when flowers have gone and love the surprise each year when I come across a little cluster in a corner of the garden.

18/02/2014 at 10:05

Hear hear re the lovely surprise in a corner you had forgotten about!  Glad to hear someone voted for the pinks, though I still can't really like them -some of the very deep ones OK, but blue then white would get my vote.   

I brought in some winter flowering bush honeysuckle twigs as the hyacinths were about over, they perfume the whole house too - not silly strong but gorgeous.

Hmm, bought some more hyacinths in a pot which were looking lonely, never could resist a plant offer -they'll do fine ………….

18/02/2014 at 10:15

Yours look lovely Chicky.  Thanks for the tip about kebab sicks.  Mine grew a lot taller than yours and nose dived over the sides of the pot. I had to tie them up with garden twine, which rather spoiled the effect.

By the way, is it true that white ones are less fragrant than other colours?

18/02/2014 at 10:17

I've got some hyacinths of the darkest mauve imaginable in a garden tub - this'll be their third spring - they're just peeking through 

18/02/2014 at 15:47

Happy c-t, I have always found the white hyacinths less perfumed than the others, but thought maybe that was just me!  Glad to hear someone else thinks so too - blue ones are always very rich and deeply perfumed. 

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