London (change)
Today 7°C / 3°C
Tomorrow 8°C / 7°C
1 to 20 of 111 messages
17/11/2013 at 23:29

I decided that 2 evergreen hellebores are just not enough I need more. New colours. I have a white and then a variagated version that is pinky. Off to the garden centre.....

 

i decided to treat myself to a stiff cup of tea when I saw that a 3" potted evergreen hellebore was £5.99!!!!!

i know that they take an age to mature but please I can't afford that!!! Any suggestions for decent sources, or alternative plants with a hellebore size and nature!! I will try and attach pictures of my 2, I'm now rather precious over them as I have seen the price tags!!

 

i cut off old flowering stems last year as newly planted and was told it would help them take hold. I have NO CLUE how to treat them, when to trim up or what to do, novice.com!!!!!!!!

17/11/2013 at 23:34

http://webkit-fake-url://9E3C273A-0042-455A-A8F7-509A7D447B32/imagejpeg

17/11/2013 at 23:45

Hayloft are good for hellebore plugs - but you need to be prepared to wait a year or two for flowers. 

I'm sure verdun will be along soon to advise - i think ashwood nurseries are his favourite

17/11/2013 at 23:48

they are fairly robust, i cut off all the old leaves to the ground in January, it seems a bit harsh but youll be rewarded when the flower spike appears closely followed by all the new leaves.

17/11/2013 at 23:51

Really scalp them completely???

 

will google those nurseries thanks

18/11/2013 at 01:38

Hiya red dahlia

I cut off every  leaf now. Two reasons...firstly any diseased leaf is removed ( they are susceptible to helleborus black spot that disfigures the plant). Secondly, the new fat flower bulbs start to emerge in January and you can see them better without the old leaves. These  flower buds extend to 60 plus cms over the next few weeks producing flowers in white, pink, red, and a whole host of others in between.

Ashwoods and woottens are 2 excellent companies.  Go for plants in at least 2 litre size, 3 litre is better.  They may be expensive, relatively, but last for years and they are very addictive. I have more than 40 different varieties and from mid jan to May there is nothing more colourful

When you plant them give them lots of compost.....mushroom compost is perfect.  Dappled shade and good soil.  

Helleborus orientalis varieties are the ones to go for 

18/11/2013 at 08:42

I have lots of baby hellebores which I dug up from a friend's garden. Should they be scalped too?  They are still in pots and I hope to plant them in the ground next month when my overgrown bushes have been pruned.

18/11/2013 at 08:45

No outdoor girl.  Leave them alone.  They need those small leaves 

18/11/2013 at 08:48

Red Dahlia, watch the seed swap next year.  They're easy from seed sown fresh and kept outside

Lyn
18/11/2013 at 09:05

Try here

http://www.hayloft-plants.co.uk/Helleborus-(Hellebore)/Double-Ellen-Collection/prod8672.html

I bought these, they will flower next winter/Spring, pot them up for now then plant out when they are a bit bigger, I know you have to wait till next year, but its well worth it, they are lovely. This is one from my daughters garden last year, they soon come on. I have never been dissapointed with Hayloft plants.

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/34084.jpg?width=512&height=350&mode=max

 

18/11/2013 at 09:12

OG it's worth taking off the old leaves - even on "babies" - they will already be developing the shoots for next year's leaves below the ground which will be at least twice the size of this year's. As Verdun says, they are susceptible to black spot and cutting off the old leaves will give them a better chance of avoiding infection. I usually scalp them in December, give them a mulch of compost, and the flowers and new leaves come up from January. Maybe mark their location somehow to make sure you don't tread on them in the meantime! I've used upturned hanging basket frames for this - works well and stops the flipping squirrel/ cats/ foxes disturbing them as well.

Red Dahlia - they are certainly expensive bought as fully mature plants but if you already have two, they will produce offspring and you'll eventually get lots of new plants for free. I leave the seed heads on once the flowers have gone over. The following Feb/Mar lots  of seedlings emerge near the parent plants. You can give them a helping hand with a paintbrush (Carol Klein did this on GW) to ensure you get seeds. No guarantee what colours they will be of course, but that's part of the fun! I have sown some seeds in pots as well, but they seem to do much better if left to do their own thing - I just pot up the seedlings, grow them on a bit and plant them out as soon as they have true leaves. They don't much like being moved, so I prefer to get them in the ground early (plus it's easier to find the space in the border for a small plant!)

All in all, what with waiting a year for seeds to germinate, it is at least three years before you start to get flowers from seed. That's why they are so expensive. Once established though, they last for years and years. Verdun's recommended the best suppliers if you really can't wait!

Give your hellebores a good mulch with good organic matter now-ish, with perhaps some slow-release fertilizer as well to give them a boost, and you should be rewarded with plenty of flowers in spring.

Warning: they are addictive

18/11/2013 at 09:13

Lyn - that is lovely. Oh oh....

18/11/2013 at 10:56

Do be careful, it is only the Orientalis type hybrids which should be scalped. Hh. niger, foetidus, ericsmithii etc should only have dead or damaged leaves removed.

I grow the Orientalis hybrids by the hundred and I never remove the leaves of the babies. unless the leaves are ' bad' . I find that if I do the plant dies.

18/11/2013 at 11:00

Oh and as far as Nursery prices are concerned. It has reached the stage now where we can no longer afford to buy. I am sure that in these days of cutbacks and reduced spending power there are a lot of people in the same position as us. Have they never heard of the law of diminishing returns?

By the way I still sell my fund raising stuff at £1 for Alpines and £1.50 for border plants.

7cm pot is about 6 p, a label 1p and say about 10p for compost and fertiliser. Maximum cost per plant is 20 p. Work out the rest of the costs for yourself and see how much mark up there may be at a Garden Centre.

 

18/11/2013 at 11:34

Sounds brilliant value Berghill. 

I do tend to buy varieties I really want and then divide them.  They are then cost effective.  

Plants are very expensive now but if bought during the dormant season can be a lot cheaper....I.e. may be smaller but will grow quickly in spring.  As always, shop around.

Re the hellebores at hayloft, they are so small that another year or two passes before they flower.  For me, it is better to buy flowering size plants for NOW.  You can actually see the flower colour too on arrival sometimes.  Interestingly, hayloft often offers plugs in threes for same cost I can purchase a full size plant for  in a 3 litre pot.  By the time hayloft plugs flower I may have my own seedlings. 

18/11/2013 at 11:42

Sounds brilliant value Berghill. 

I do tend to buy varieties I really want and then divide them.  They are then cost effective.  

Plants are very expensive now but if bought during the dormant season can be a lot cheaper....I.e. may be smaller but will grow quickly in spring.  As always, shop around.

Re the hellebores at hayloft, they are so small that another year or two passes before they flower. It is TIME.    For me, it is better to buy flowering size plants for NOW.  You can actually see the flower colour too on arrival sometimes.  Interestingly, hayloft often offers plugs in threes for same cost I can purchase a full size plant for  in a 3 litre pot.  By the time hayloft plugs flower I may have my own seedlings.  Its not just with hellebores......they have same system with most of their perennials.  I bought new varieties of agastache last year for less than hayloft charged for their plugs.  My agastaches provided fantastic show all summer and I now have divided them and planted them in 1 litre pots to,provide an even better display next year. 

Hellebores apparently resent being divided but I find they respond very well to it without affecting the flowering.

18/11/2013 at 11:45

all good advice. Although I feel sorry for growers in these difficult times and growing your own plants sure makes you realise how much care and patience it takes! Based on my success rate, I would certainly struggle to make a living that way. I save money where I can but when I simply must have a certain plant, fully grown, I am prepared to pay more for a really good, well-established, healthy plant. 

Will certainly take heed of your advice re hellebore babies, Berghill

18/11/2013 at 12:38

Division of Helleborus orientalis is best done in later Summer/early Autmn as they grow new roots as the temepratures begin to fall.

A little tale from a few years back.

We went to a local Supermarket (independent one) and waited while they unloaded a lorryload of plants. We looked at them as they were carried in and thought they were good quaality and price.  didn't nuy as we already had all the ones we could see. Then drove to a near by gardem cemtre. Surpise, the same lorry was off loading there too. We looked at the plants, same size, same varieties same quality.................£10 more!

18/11/2013 at 13:38

I am going to look at my labels tonight and then you can all tell me if they are the sort I should cut back or leave. 

One was a free gift and the other variagated I bought for 7.99 from do it all as it was stunning. tge white one I have had in for 2 years the variagated has been in only one year.

 

they got chicken pellets twice in spring but shall I put some fish and bone round them when I dress with my spent compost??

18/11/2013 at 21:12

Feed then mulch .  Hellebores are greedy and respond to good comditions

1 to 20 of 111 messages