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7 messages
08/06/2014 at 10:37

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48505.jpg?width=273&height=350&mode=max

 

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/48504.jpg?width=489&height=350&mode=max

 

Hi everyone.

I've had these lovely white pelargoniums for 4 years in a pot with bacopa and white allysum.  I've never fed them any other year than this and each year I just scrape away the top couple of inches of compost and replace this couple on inches with new multi-p.  They always come up nicely.

A week ago they were budding nicely on nice fresh new shoots with buds.  For some stupid reason, as I was going around feeding potted plants with liquid tomato feed and without thinking poured some (highly diluted) also into the white pelargonium pot.

Now, the flowers are mis-shapen and are opening with green veins on them all, as you see in the photo.  The whole pot photo is July 2013 and the green veined flowers photo was taken today.

Do you think this has happened due to the erroneous tomato feed - or is this some other condition which I could possibly rectify? Or not?

Feeling stupid!

Many thanks.

08/06/2014 at 10:47

I don't think it's the tomato food yarrow but I can't offer a solution. Sometimes these things are viral but I'm sure someone more knowledgeable than me will be able to help.  I don't really do pelargoniums but I've got a bright pink one which I take cuttings from and I use tomato food for them. They get done occasionally when I do other plants with it. 

08/06/2014 at 10:53

Hi 'Fairygirl'.  I was never 'into' pelargoniums until I discovered that with this garden being pretty much enclosed, they survive the winter very well here outside and I never have to do anything with them except a good watering whenever they get bone dry. I get a lot of unpredictable wind in this garden which ruins tall or thin-stemmed plants to the point of destruction and the pelargoniums stand up to anything.  The rain ruins their 'look' of course - but just pulling off the petals and off they go re-blooming again.  So in my garden, they brighten things up dotted around in their pots and are sturdy stalwarts when everything else blows over and looks a total mess.

I've come to love them and I never thought I would!  (It's a pity my late mother isn't around to hear me declare this - I just know she would be laughing like mad and nodding with 'I told you so' written all over her face).

08/06/2014 at 14:00

Yarrow - it was about the only plant that survived my Mum 'footering' with it! She even did cuttings  

I think a row of identical ones in matching pots can be a great feature along steps or something similar. There's a lovely dark plummy one 'Lord Bute' which I've often thought of getting but never quite did 

08/06/2014 at 19:20

I feed pelargoniums...I have a conservatory full of 'em.......with tomato feed, seaweed spray, etc.  it's what they need.  

Whatever is happening to yours yarrow I'm sure it's not the feed. Coincidental I think.  However,possibly, the feed formed droplets on the flowers and were burned by the sun.  Was it a sunny day?   If so, the next lot of flowers will probably be as they were before

08/06/2014 at 21:50

LOL! Fairygirl.  I haven't heard the description 'footering' since mum passed away.  Love it.   Yes, they do look great when they're 'placed' and so reliable.  I like the sound of 'Lord Bute'.  I think they always look stunning in early evening when the sun starts to lower.  Such strong colour.

Verdun - it WAS a sunny day.  I'll see what happens with them next as it looks as if the whole pot are behaving the same way.  I'll see how it goes and then maybe chop the stems and see if the next growth comes up as normal.

Thank you.

 

08/06/2014 at 21:54

I do a lot of footering yarrow....

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