Start a new thread

1 to 20 of 22 replies

punkdoc

Sedums are no longer called Sedums, but are now called Hylotelephiums.

That will make life easier then.

herbaceous

Noooooooooo! How are the ignorant among us ever to catch up? I like sedums, they look after themselves. Its a conspiracy like crazy spelling to confuse the unwary and I'm not joining in.

Dovefromabove

OMG ... how am I supposed to remember that ... I'm 27!!! 

Hi-low whats?  

fidgetbones

From wikipedia

Sedum telephium, often called Hylotelephium telephium,

Not in this garden it isn't..

pansyface

THEY ARE LUCKY TO EVEN GET CALLED SEDUMS HERE.

I CALLED THEM POPPER PLANTS WHEN I WAS FIVE, AND I STILL DO.

Advertisement

Obelixx

Remember when they changed crysanths to dendrasomething and there was an outcry so they changed it back.   Taxonomy gone mad.  Sedums for me.

madpenguin

Not only are some Sedum now called Hylotelephium but others are now Petrosedum and Phedimus 

Papi Jo

... and most asters are now called Symphyotrichum;

Dicentra spectabilis is Lamprocapnos spectabilis,

Etc.

"That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet." 

Joyce21

I will be sticking to the names that I and other over 27s know.

herbaceous

Oh Joyce! I'm over 27 and I don't know the old names. I like wildflowers, they have much easier and nicer names, stuff like Germander Speedwell, Dove's foot cranesbill, Rose-bay Willow herb...........

madpenguin

......and as well as Hylotelephium,Petrosedum and Phedimus there are still some which are called Sedum!

Berghill

Blame DNA testing. Plants which were lumped together as being related because they looked similar are now being found to not be related after all. That means that the old name is no longer valid in Botanical terms that is. According to Botanists you cannot call a Rose a Rose if it is not a Rose.

Papi Jo

@Berghill,

 "A rose is a rose is a rose

Fairygirl

Sedums will still be sedums here - as will dicentras. They can change their names as often as they want, but as I'm also slightly more than 27, it's hard enough remembering the name of things I look at every day without trying to cope with a new one  

Hostafan1

I'm happy for names to change due to scientific research showing they're not all the same,  but I'm not going to use " buddleja"  just because someone looked and has decided the first description looks more like a "j" than an "i". That's just speculation. Buddleia for me.

Advertisement

B3

Are botanists gardeners?  

Obelixx

It's not just gardeners affected, it's nurserymen and women, large scale plant producers, label producers and more.    I can see the botanical and even economic importance of distinguishing between say a geranium and a pelargonium but not the need to change a sedum into something radically different.

Mike Allen

In some areas of science, plese believe me.  It's not much unlike being an MP in government.  Tom, Dick or Harry has risen to fame and feels it a must to make and leave his/her mark upon history.  This type linkin etc with plants, and the susequent renaming will continue to go on and on.  With all the experimenting and cross breeding, the DNA banks are busting at the seams.  Don't worry too much.  With todays Hi Tech.  The problem is solved for you.  For instance the Internet.  Type in  a word/name etc and you have it, page after page of info.  That coomon weed in your garden suddenly is displayed as  blah blah etc.  Modern technology has come this far, just one or two words, and you have your answer.  I truly hate to imagin the future.

Papi Jo
B3 says:

Are botanists gardeners?  

See original post

 I like to see myself as both an (amateur) botanist and (amateur) gardener.

punkdoc

IMO, a little bit of botanical knowledge, is very helpful in becoming a better gardener.