Start a new thread

1 to 7 of 7 replies

We have a well established wisteria plant trained up the side of the house. It is rooted in a concrete path right next to the house and over 30 or so years it has attained a height and spread of about 15 feet.

Due to damp problems on the wall, the wisteria has to be taken away from the wall and re-positioned. Would it be feasible to retrain it over an arch, away from the wall, or would it be better to prune it back and retrain it when it grows back? Can wisteria withstand such heavy pruning?

Iamweedy

You might be able to cut it back and retrain it across to a pergola well  away from the wall. It could take time to grow back but if the roots are still OK. It's worth a try as  growing a new one would take a lot longer .

This is from the RHS page about wisteria .

With older plants severe pruning may be needed to remove old, worn-out growths, or branches growing over windows or protruding outwards from the face of the building. Likewise, hard pruning maybe required where maintenance needs to be carried out on the structure supporting the plant.

Drastically shortening back long branches, removing sections of older stems to just above a strong young branch or growth shoot lower down, or cutting completely back to a main branch, or even to ground level may be necessary. A careful, unhurried approach is needed if larger, thicker branches are to be removed and where a branch is twining it may be necessary to trace back and mark it at intervals with string before removing it. The end result should be a skeleton frame work of reasonably well-spaced branches.

Doghouse Riley

From where is the damp coming? The wall looks fine to me. Do you think the wisteria is causing the damp? I wouldn't have thought so, but then that photo is six years old, so it won't be an accurate image of the wisteria.

Wisteria are pretty whippy. I've replaced two pergolas under them. I made a temporary support for them whilst I was doing this. It depends where you're going to put your arch.

Alternatively, you could put a few  big "L shaped "brackets on the wall to support it so that it doesn't touch the wall, if you think it's causing a problem.

Iamweedy

Doghouse Riley

I constructed a freestanding support for my wisteria about seven years ago. I am not sure how long it will last but if it does fall down I will get a proper pergola for it.

From what you say It sounds as if I could cut it right back if necessary and get it to regrow . There is no soil adjacent to the house to plant it in and I need to keep it low enough to prune by myself. 

Thank you for the helpful replies. This is the best photo we have which shows the wisteria against the wall but you're right, it is 6 years old and it has grown right up to the top of the house,entwining the down pipe and also getting under the guttering. 

We are keen to retain the wisteria against the wall so will probably look at fixing a trellis against but off the wall and making sure the plant is pruned regularly.

Advertisement

Doghouse Riley

If it is  of any encouragement, this was a wisteria we inherited when we bought our house in 1972.  It was just trained up the side of the garage. When I built our koi pool in 1986  I built a pergola to support it.. About ten years ago I had to replace it with a much sturdier one.

This is what it looked like when I decided all that wood was ugly and spreading out to far into the path.

A couple of the branches had long since died and the stumps were rotten. So I drastically pruned it.

Fortunately it had layered itself in a few places and there was one branch that was trained to travel round and over the end of the pergola on the back of the  house and crossed with another growing from the other end. It's the  bit with the bungie cord, I'm training it to be a bit closer to the wall there.

A year on and and it's doing fine

Lovely effect you have achieved there. I can see something like that working in or garden but my wife is not keen, preferring to put it back on the wall when the damp problem has been sorted out, but fixed to a trellis of some sort.

Thanks for your advice anyway.

Sign up or log in to post a reply