6 messages
12/06/2013 at 13:19
12/06/2013 at 14:11

chinese bayberry

Cultivation details                                          Prefers a moist soil. Grows well in an open position in a well-drained soil in sun or light shade. Thrives in any ordinary garden soil. Prefers a lime-free loamy or peaty soil. Not very hardy in Britain, it succeeds outdoors in the milder areas of the country according to one report, whilst another says that it only succeeds in zone 10 and does not tolerate frosts. Plants succeed outdoors in Japan as far north as Tokyo, but it is difficult to get them to fruit there.. This plant has been recommended for improvement by selection and breeding for its edible fruit. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus. Many species in this genus have a symbiotic relationship with certain soil micro-organisms, these form nodules on the roots of the plants and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby.                                                                                   Propagation                                          Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame. Barely cover the seed and keep it moist. Stored seed germinates more freely if given a 3 month cold stratification and then sown in a cold frame. Germination is usually good. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow on in the cold frame for the first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 8cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Pot up and overwinter in a cold frame. Fair to good percentage. Cuttings of mature wood in November/December in a frame. Layering in spring. Division of suckers in the dormant season. Plant them out direct into their permanent positions.
12/06/2013 at 14:13

Amazing what you can find on tinterweb

13/06/2013 at 19:52

Leslie ,  Myrica Rubra is also known as the chinese bayberry

13/06/2013 at 22:02

fidgetbones, thankyou, but have seed now and spose will have to keep until august(autumn), also think seed could be ripe now as fruits are ready in early june. Im still confused but thats not difficult. may I ask where this information is available.

13/06/2013 at 22:26

I didn't know what Myrica rubra was by any of its names Leslie so I did a google search. There's lots of info there.

It's your seed, you don't 'have to' anything. If you've got ripe seed, sow it,

june seems very early to have ripe fruit from a non hardy plant but I know nothing about them so i'll shut up. 

 

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