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12 messages
14/11/2013 at 13:21

I have 10 beech trees and at this time of year they are a problem.  Have decided to try using them as drainage when planting up pots eg baby pansies which have seeded. Has anyone done this successfuly and can they think of another use for them - I have heaps!!

14/11/2013 at 13:34

Won't the wildlife eventually make good use of them?  

There was a drop in the population of small rodents last year because of the wet spring and summer and the floods, and consequently owls struggled to survive  last winter - hopefully all the small rodents will have had successful broods this summer and now we have a mast year to feed them all - good news for the predators, owls, kestrels, stoats etc 

KEF
14/11/2013 at 14:59

I've had to look up what Beech masts are.

I'm now not sure if my "beech" hedge is a hornbeam, as I've never had any masts. It's hard to tell from google imagines what my hedge is. I think maybe hornbeam as it is in an exposed place and on clay.

Is it only mature beech trees that produce masts or do hedges also have them?

Any ideas ?

14/11/2013 at 15:08

Beech hedges are usually kept clipped, which keeps them functioning as an 'immature' sapling, rather than a mature tree - that's why they don't fruit. 

KEF
14/11/2013 at 16:25

Better put the celebration wine away, was going to toast the new Hornbeam hedge

Thanks Dove, but still wonder what we've got. Pics I've found of the two don't look at all different to me. Don't suppose it really matters.

14/11/2013 at 16:30

KEF I've found this, if it's any help ...

"While the leaves of the beech and the hornbeam are superficially similar, closer inspection reveals those of the beech to have smooth edges, while the hornbeam's are sharply serrated. Another giveaway is its buds which appear on the twigs in winter. The hornbeam's are flush to the branch in contrast to the beech's which are longer and slimmer and point out at an angle."

KEF
14/11/2013 at 16:38

Thanks again Dove. Out to check it at the weekend.

15/11/2013 at 13:12

We also have beech trees bordering the garden and end up with HUGE amounts of beech masts everywhere. Much better than mobile phone masts though

When I've managed to inadvertently plant them during potting on of small plants they do grow quite well, even if planted a long way down so I'm not sure they'd make good drainage.

I have potted some up and sold the small trees in 3" pots at charity events and the bull and chaffinches love them. It keeps the small birds going well over the winter.

KEF
17/11/2013 at 12:50
Dovefromabove wrote (see)

KEF I've found this, if it's any help ...

"While the leaves of the beech and the hornbeam are superficially similar, closer inspection reveals those of the beech to have smooth edges, while the hornbeam's are sharply serrated. Another giveaway is its buds which appear on the twigs in winter. The hornbeam's are flush to the branch in contrast to the beech's which are longer and slimmer and point out at an angle."

The leaves on the hedge look slightly serrated but feel smooth not sharp. The new buds are slender and are at about a 30 degree angle from main twig.

I declare the hedge to be Beech  Thank you for finding the info' Dove.

17/11/2013 at 13:09

http://s3.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/34068.gif?width=28&height=100&mode=max

 

17/11/2013 at 13:10

Oh poo, that didn't copy very well - it's supposed to be dashing around shouting Woohoo!!!

17/11/2013 at 17:16

Do you mean beech mast, which are the nuts, or the receptacles which hold the beech mast?

If you mean the nuts or seeds, leave them for the wildlife.

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