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16 messages
19/03/2012 at 21:19

my camellias plants leaves are gone yelllow and i didnt even get flowers this year,does anyone know whats wrong?

25/03/2012 at 11:18

Your soil is too limey. Camellias like Acid soil although are alot more tolerant than other acid loving plants. Feed them with a special feed for ericacious or acid loving plants. Also save your old tea bags, split them & add the tea leaves to the base of the plant as well. Tea leaves are acidic. You could also give it a top dressing of ericacous compost. Hope this helps

02/05/2013 at 18:44

My camellia's leaves are turning light green then yellow and flowers are turning brown as soon as they come into bloom.  I have two camellias in the pot on the patio and one is perfectly fine, yet I feed them and tend to them in the same way? What's wrong?!

02/05/2013 at 18:51

I would not jump to saying that the soil is too 'limey' as yellowing of Camellia is also a symptom of overwatering and wind burn. They also can yellow as the old leaves fall off and they are putting on a lot of new growth now. I would also say that Camellia are one of the few plants that need ericacious soil -

02/05/2013 at 18:52

Do you water them with hard tap water? Rain water is best. They need feeding with acid fertiliser. Flowers can turn brown because of frost or morning sun after a cold night.

02/05/2013 at 19:06

I have two Camellias in pots of ericaceous compost but leaves turned yellow.  I think the reason was that they were pot bound because watering them with an ericaceous feed did not make a difference. So I have just re-potted them in to larger pots and waiting to see if this brings them back to a nice green colour.

02/05/2013 at 19:15

Rory it's also important to ensure they get adequate water during the summer months as that's when they form the following year's flowers. Be really vigilant this year since yours are in pots! 

02/05/2013 at 19:17

My Camelia blooms turn brown after frosts through early morning sun on them. I did not plant it but  think it is in the wrong part of the garden getting the early sun which does the damage but as it is now nine feet tall cannot do much about it.

02/05/2013 at 19:45

You could try throwing a large piece of fleece over them on frosty nights and see if that helps 

02/05/2013 at 19:51

You can prune them and they will regrow P.Watts so perhaps you could prune it in stages throughout the year , taking care to feed and water etc and when it's a more manageable size you could transplant carefully to a new location. Worth a shot ! It's either that or trying to plant something else nearby to give it a bit more protection. I've often moved stuff when you're not meant to without any problem but always taken care to give plenty of tlc. 

02/05/2013 at 21:49

Yellowing leaves are also caused by magnesium deficiency.   You can fix that by mixing one tablespoon of Epsom salts in a gallon of water and then pouring it over as a foliar feed.  Make sure you use soft or rain water for this and for any other treatment you give it such as sequestered iron to help correct an iron deficiency..

12/05/2013 at 17:36

Bump

12/05/2013 at 17:52

Iron Sequestrene is a good tonic for camellias as it helps them take up nutrients you are feeding them. They hate early morning sun and frosts damage the flowers without fail. Rainwater only (occasional tapwater is OK) and lots of it in late summer/autumn to help flowerbud formation. Eriaceous compost only in pots, and daily "cup of tea" is good. You can eat the cake.

12/05/2013 at 18:46

P. watts, I would suggest you cover your camelia with fleece when frost is expected.  I think it's frost and resultant rapid thawing that's the reason for your problems.

27/05/2013 at 22:11

My camellia leaves turned brown lots of buds that turned brown & never opened.

29/04/2014 at 16:48

My camellias are trees.  Have  been shaped in the past but not touched for a few years.  The ground nearby has become very wet.  They flowered profusely however, but now the leaves are yellowing.  They are on the edge of a wood and there is lots of leaf mould around.  Ideal conditions one would have thought although an azalea next door also didn't seem happy but has recovered.  Any further clues?

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