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9 messages
19/02/2014 at 16:54

Do you think it would be ok to have hyacinths and tulips (i.e. spring flowers) in the same containers as gladioli and lillies?   Would everything have enough root space and also, would the summer flowers die back sufficiently to give the spring flowers pride of place when their turn comes?

19/02/2014 at 17:01

Sorry, I should have mentioned that the containers are about a metre long and 20cm side.

19/02/2014 at 17:06

I presume, that like me you have a small garden and don't have the space to have different pots for every season. I have 2 big 'winter' pots each one planted with; a small conifer, variagated ivy and tulips (there were cyclamens the first year, but they all rotted in the extreme cold of that winter). In the summer, the tulips having died back I plant a pelagonium and either trailing lobelia or Bacopa. Sometimes I remember to feed these 2 hardworking pots

The summer flowers can be cut down to ground level late in the Autumn to make way for the spring floweres. As to root space, I tend to think that the plants negotiate about that themselves, with anything that has a thuggish habit taking over.

19/02/2014 at 17:22

Lol  , I love the idea of the plants doing their own negotiations artjak.  Ok, that sounds good then.  I wasn't sure if the gladioli or lillies could be cut down. 

 

19/02/2014 at 20:04

I do the same as Artjak - bulbs in spring and annuals like petunia and lobellia in summer.  The annuals have plenty of room to sit above the bulbs - not sure how much room there would be for lilies and gladioli (ie a second lot of bulbs) side by side with the spring bulbs - maybe consider non bulb plants for summer instead?  Or bulbs for summer and non bulbs like primroses or pansies for spring?

19/02/2014 at 20:25

Me three! I had begonias in my biggest pot. Yanked them out when they were dead, already for winter. Once bulbs (spring flowers have gone over) it'll be off with their foliage and in with what ever annual I fancy!

19/02/2014 at 21:19

Great, thanks 4thPanda.

19/02/2014 at 22:09

You are welcome, should have added that I also put violas and pansies in them in the autumn, pics below:

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37871.jpg?width=512&height=350&mode=max

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37872.jpg?width=307&height=350&mode=max

http://s4.gardenersworld.com/uploads/images/original/37873.jpg?width=307&height=350&mode=max

Bulbs now growing through violas and pansies 

 

19/02/2014 at 22:56

Charley D.

 

Seeing that name, tends to remind me of Charley Dimmock from that onetime TV gardening series.

 

Charley.  If your container is lage enough, why not.  Let's face it.  Each container and in the case of those specializing in alpines.  The sink garden.  All of these containers, pots or whatever.  They are all extensions of your graden or growing area.  Treat them with respect.  Perhaps I might be able to offer a tip or two here.  For example.  Suppose you have a round pedestal type planter.  To produce a good display of, shall we say daffs, or tulips.  These can be mixed.  The usual guidline of bulb planting is.  Plant the bulb double it's height [root base to growing tip]  For a much fuller planter.  Plant a number of bulbs one and a half times their depth, even if large bulbs, go do going deeper.  Cover with soil/compost then plant your main layer.  The results will speak for themselves.  In a like manner, By all means plant your spring and summer subjects in a similar way.  Apart from the fact that your container will always be full.  It saves you the job of removing and replanting.

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