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Derby Bean Bush Plants May Have Diseases - How do I treat?

Hello, I have recently started growing Derby bean plants. It has been 2 weeks since they've germinated, and in total they have been growing 3 weeks. The first week after germination was fine, but this week they have been developing some sort of disease. The soil they are growing in has white spots (Fungus?), and one of the plants has a small brown Mushroom growing next to it! (I plan to kill the mushroom soon). In addition, the leaves have small white spots on them, and I think the diseased soil is effecting them. I don't know what to do. Here is some extra information - I am growing these for a science fair, I want them to live for 5 weeks at least, and then it is fine with me if they die - They have been growing indoors, and sometimes the soil is damp. They grow in large plastic cups, and have chopsticks as supports (some of them lean in weird ways, so the chopsticks help with that). They get all the sunlight they need, as they are near a window sill. I give them water daily, and they were doing fine for the first two weeks. There are also little baby fruit flies sitting on the leaves or on the dirt they are in, which I am planning to kill with fly spray very soon (should I, or will it effect the plants)? Now, since I'm growing them inside, I cannot give them fungicide because it might effect me. Even if I did, I'd either have to not water them for a few days (Because the fungicide might effect me), or take them outside (where things might get worse) What do I do? I am no experienced gardener, and this is my first time with bean derby plants.

nutcutlet

you've lost me there, sorry

nutcutlet

too many things I don't know BobbyJ. I don't know what Derby beans are for one.

Images might help.

A window never gives enough light

anything wet and indoors will be subject to fungal growth.

your chemical intervention will affect the plants.

A bit of fresh air and less water would probably be more beneficial

nutcutlet says:

too many things I don't know BobbyJ. I don't know what Derby beans are for one.

Images might help.

A window never gives enough light

anything wet and indoors will be subject to fungal growth.

your chemical intervention will affect the plants.

A bit of fresh air and less water would probably be more beneficial

See original post
If I move them outside, would it be better then? And yes, I'm giving them less water daily starting today.

 

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fidgetbones

What country are you in?

What is the ambient temperature?

nutcutlet

where are you and how warm is it outside. These plants will be very soft and wouldn't cope with being put outside and left there. 

I live in Arizona. It's about 70-90 Degrees outside, but it's in the 80s normally. It's fall, so not as hot as it is in summer. There is a LOT of sunlight, but lately lots of rain and sometimes thunder storms (We have monsoons here).

I live in the USA, to clear that up

fidgetbones

Derby bush beans are what we call french beans

I would put them outside. water well. Keep out of direct sunshine if the temperature is above 70 degrees fahrenheit.

fidgetbones

incidentally, they don't come from France or Derby, but from South America.

so, the bean plants basically have a "Wall of window" and I think they get enough light. If I must, I will move them outside. One of the pictures (the one with MULTIPLE LEAVES) is my mother's plants. I think fungus gnats carried their diseases to MY almost healthy bean plants (the picture with ONE leaf with small white spots is my bean plants). See, my mom doesn't care at all about her plants. Also, the picture with the blue plastic cups shows some of the dirt has white specks on it. I think that is fungus that might effect the plants. What to do???

fidgetbones

Ignore the white spots on the compost. Put them outside.

fidgetbones

If you intend growing them on, they will need bigger pots, and a cane  for support.

Last edited: 02 October 2016 23:06:05

Dovefromabove

Put them outside. The light indoors is much less than outside - even by a big window. If you don't believe me use a camera light meter and measure it. I think you'll be surprised. If you're interested in science that will be a good thing to do. 

Last edited: 03 October 2016 08:03:23

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