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All my snowdrop petals have been eaten.  Would this be slugs and snails?  Shouldn't they be hibernating at this time of year?

nutcutlet

Have they been eaten or are they still lying there. Birds sometimes just peck flowers off and leave them. Doubt slugs and snails for the reasons you give. Might be the same b..... that's eaten my hellebore flowers

There is absolutely nothing left at all so very odd.  My hellebores are fine but in the garden not under trees.  Having said that the snails I get in the garden would grace a French restaurant table they are so huge and prolific!  Beetles maybe but wouldnt they take bits rather than totally demolish?

Sue T

Same problem but just discovered some petals half torn so think the answer may be birds. I keep an eye on them but never see it happening though we do get wood pigeons and they have a reputation for this sort of thing.

Sue

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Every year my snowdrops are attacked by mainly slugs small ones. They will clear a clump of snowdrops completely eating the flower petals first often tearing the petals first.  They then move down and consume the rest till there is only a stalk left. The only solution is to clear the area around the snowdrops of slugs.  I do this by catching as many as I can at night with a torch and using slugs pellets if there are too many. My snowdrops are good this year. PS if I don't watch out my daffs go the same way with larger slugs and they nestle in the flower! 

Mark56

Is it too early for earwigs  they devoured my beautiful clematis petals last year and I want revenge! Olive oil and Soy sauce concoction may have to make a return

Last edited: 18 February 2017 16:59:11

Obelixx

Slugs.  I brought 20 wee pots of snowdrops to this new garden and, when putting them out on display yesterday, found over a dozen small slugs lurking under the pots.

BobTheGardener

Been out in the garden to and there are plenty (hundreds in my case) of slugs about under leaves etc.  It's a myth that they hibernate and are active any time the temperature is above freezing, especially during and after rain.  It be them wot dunnit!

Last edited: 18 February 2017 17:44:40

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