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21 to 40 of 48 messages
25/02/2014 at 17:52

Last year I had what looked like mutant giant slugs striped and really disgusting - collected them up in a bucket of salted water with my kitchen burger tongs (must add don't use them in the kitchen anymore) and then every couple of days poured them down the drain in the road...... they were the biggest I have ever seen...

25/02/2014 at 19:03

When we first moved here there were hundreds of snails living in a periwinkle covered wall and munching everything I planted, I gave the kids a bucket each and bribed them to fill them up, when the buckets were full I had the bright idea to throw them in the rayburn fire, never again! the smell was disgusting, we had to leave the house for over six hours. Nematodes work the best but you have to water them in and the last thing my garden needs right now is more water. 

25/02/2014 at 19:05

OMG!!  Cut them up with scissors, yughhhhhhhh!!  All very well collecting them in a bucket, but getting rid of them afterwards - can't bear the thought .  I stick with the pellets and shut my eyes when getting rid of the bodies!

KEF
25/02/2014 at 19:24

Cover your eyes...I stab slugs with hand fork and leave them on the path for the birds, snails I pick up and put on path and stand on them, also bird food. If I go out at night and don't want to go up the path I drop my mole on them. Stone ornament with a flat base & shift the mess in the morning.

My view:  my veg, my flowers, free birdie snap.  

25/02/2014 at 21:56

I find coffee grinds round plants works really well, but also collect in bucket of salted water, but towards end of last summer slugs were actually climbing out of quite strongly salted water!  Scary stuff- just how much salt is needed?

25/02/2014 at 21:58
StillLearning - it sounds like you had leopard slugs which I have been told actually assist in the composting process. I often find them in my compost bins and just leave them but they are the only slugs that get preferential treatment.
26/02/2014 at 00:33

Oh StillLearning I never kill those wonderful big slugs.  They do no harm.  They used to come out at night and graze the moss on the wall by my back door.

Use a bit of discrimination!

26/02/2014 at 07:14

I only kill them if I catch them munching a plant. Even then I give them to my chickens who love them!! Circle of life

26/02/2014 at 07:15

Looks like we'd better be educating ourselves Tracey on which slugs to kill which to fling across the fence to the neighbours!

26/02/2014 at 08:36

We get the big orange slugs mating on our back lawn on dewy mornings in the summer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_slug they're amazing - and they eat the little slugs which are the ones that eat most living plant matter, so we leave the big orange jobs alone 

26/02/2014 at 08:41
Did I actually say that I would did that Clari, I could have sworn I only thought it.......how very very spooky

I'm coming off this thread now until later when I've had my breakfast......it's all making me a but queazy and yes I know I started it. (Funny sick face as all my smilies have gone again!)
26/02/2014 at 09:21
iGrow wrote (see)
StillLearning - it sounds like you had leopard slugs which I have been told actually assist in the composting process. I often find them in my compost bins and just leave them but they are the only slugs that get preferential treatment.

 

Jigsaw Gill wrote (see)

I find coffee grinds round plants works really well, but also collect in bucket of salted water, but towards end of last summer slugs were actually climbing out of quite strongly salted water!  Scary stuff- just how much salt is needed?

I believe it is the caffeine in coffee that deters slugs though it may also be the smell as they home in in tasty leaves by scent receptors.

You do need quite a lot of salt - it should dissolve them quickly, not allow them to climb out.

Edd
26/02/2014 at 09:36

Caffeine is a neurologically toxic to slugs and snails. A cup of instant coffee contains about 0.05 per cent caffeine, brewed coffee has far more. You only need about 0.01 to deter slugs. I guess that used coffee grounds contain this amount as they have been washed out. You could always add extra instant coffee to the grounds to increase the caffeine potency.

Edd
26/02/2014 at 09:42

Here is a very good web site for identifying good and bad slugs. There is also some helpful information to read.

http://www.slugoff.co.uk/

 

26/02/2014 at 10:31
So, put my egg shells in the oven to cook off the membrane, then mix with coffee grounds......result no manual handling of slugs necessary. I hardly ever find dead slugs in the garden so think they must get eaten before I get there which is a bonus
Edd
26/02/2014 at 11:43

Hi Tracey.

The problem with coffee grounds is that the worms absolutely love to eat them and they get through them very fast so you will need a constant supply. The local coffee shops supply them for free but they tend to be large sacks that are quite heavy. I usually ask for them in the morning and then pick them up at the end of the day when i can park near by and nip in. 

The egg shells only work as a barrier when they are dry but they are good for the soil. The worms use them to aid their digestion.

26/02/2014 at 15:11

Edd are coffee ground or instant ok/good for the soil or do you need to be careful with quantities?

Tracey sound like you should patent that mix, double whammy!

26/02/2014 at 15:28

I bake my eggshells in the oven, 15mins at 220, takes all the moisture out of them so that they're really brittle and super scratchy. it gets rid of anything that vermin may find attractive as well. but also do snail patrol with a torch after dark too.

 

Edd
26/02/2014 at 15:38

Hello Ashleigh 2.

Coffee grounds are great for the soil but most (not all) of the caffeine has been washed out.  You can make a solution of instant coffee and apply that but again it washes through very quickly. The effects of caffeine on slugs (death) take time and it often looks like nothing is happening (but it is). I have seen no adverse effects to plants and no change in the veg flavour.

I use them regularly in my outside worm bins as they heat up and keep the frost away. I guess they produce a lot of bacteria (hence the heat) as the worms love to eat it. I have never found any slugs or eggs when sieving the worm compost and i have been doing it for years so it must work.

26/02/2014 at 15:53

Thank you Edd, I found quite a few today, so time to begin the battle again.

21 to 40 of 48 messages