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6 messages
18/01/2012 at 12:01

A metal fence and a concrete path seperate my greenhouse from an ever advancing bamboo. Sold as a dwarf variety, its cuckoo tendancies soon came to light when the main clump grew approx 6m tall, however I was  taken in by the way it swayed so elegantly in the breeze and it stayed.

Now behaving like a rioting teenager the bamboo is causing grief & destruction and I have no idea how to control it. We've all had a hack & thrown weedkiller at it but instead of taking the hint my efforts have only seem to have encouraged it to do a bit of travelling, its latest journey through the cracks in the concrete path and into the green house where its already hitting the roof. The green house is large, made of wood, has a soil base, and on its last legs but I can't afford to replace it.  Any suggestions???

Thanks 

18/01/2012 at 18:18

I do know that Bamboo is difficult to remove. I have a Bamboo, mine is growing quite happily in a large pot, its been in there for nearly ten years and is still going strong. Have a look at this web site it may help you. Good luck 

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18/01/2012 at 18:21

That looks like it came out as complete rubbish, sorry about that. Here is the web site. www.completebamboo.com/bamboo_removal.html

19/01/2012 at 06:16

There seems to be only one solution to this bamboo, and that must be to dig it up.    It will probably take a long time to get rid of it, as I expect little bits left in the soil will start shooting again.    There are two kinds of bamboo.   One spreads and the other is clump-forming.   It is so annoying when a plant has been labelled with the wrong information, but you must now get rid of it, before it takes over your whole garden and demolishes your greenhouse for you!     Dig, and keep digging.    Sometimes these pesky plants take a couple of years or more to get rid of, but if you dig it out each time you see a shoot, with as much root as possible, you will eventually succeed.

22/01/2012 at 11:35

This is all very well, but what if these triffids are in your neighbour's garden and all they want is to shut themselves away and screen every glimpse of their neighbours? Ours have both the scaffolding size stem type and the clump-forming type. If you shave with a hedgetrimmer the part of the latter that invades your own side, it just encourages it to grow thicker until it takes all light off your garden, washing line etc. The other sort just grows up and up and it's stems end up like trees. A previous neighbour got rid of his 60 ft high leylandii and our veg garden breathed again, but now we have this scourge.

24/01/2012 at 20:00

I know it sounds easy for me to say, but the best thing to do, that is it is growing under a boundery fence. Is to dig down your side of the fence and slice off the roots and put a protective barrier there, you can buy thick rubber barrier material from the garden centre, or otherwise put a steel sheet about a metre in the ground. That will stop any rhozimes protruding into the garden in the future.

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