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8 messages
26/07/2013 at 19:49


I have a thriving Jalapeno plant in my greenhouse, and another 2 chilli plants.  The plant is amazingly healthy, lots of flower and foliage but NO FRUIT!


Incidentally my tomato plants are very poor in yield as well, lots of flower drop there too.  I wonder if the two problems are related?

I hardly ever watered the Jalapeno but in a fit of desperation I've started to give it some Phostrogen!

Any help appreciated!



26/07/2013 at 20:42

They are dropping off because they have not been pollinated.  Can insects get at 'em!

26/07/2013 at 23:02

I thought jalapenos - like other capiscums - self pollinated.

26/07/2013 at 23:34

OK, they do in the main, but insects play a part too. I've often seen insects on my chilli plants.

 I always understood tomatoes were self-pollinating; so why do growers import thousands of bumble bees each year to help with pollination?  Bees, incidentally which are bringing in parasites which are harming our native bees.

I would also suggest DMG shakes the plants gently and makes sure the ventilation is good.

27/07/2013 at 08:07

I had asimilar problem a month or so back and was advised to either take the plants outside for the day occassionally, or manual polinate.

I tend to get my paint brush out and give each flower a littel tickle, since starting this the chilli plant has produced lots of huge chillis, i am just waiting for them to turn red, although i have eaten quite a few in the green state which are just as nice.

27/07/2013 at 10:05

Yep, it never hurts to give pollination a helping hand with toms and chillies. Outdoors, insects and even a breeze will agitate the flower's internal mechanism and trigger pollination. A brush with the hand or a flick with the fingers achieves the same thing. Indoors, away from insects and a breeze, it's an even better idea.

01/10/2013 at 19:50

Does anyone know if these chilli plants will last over the winter months if they are brought inside?

01/10/2013 at 23:10

Yes. Most chillies are  perennial but tender. A warm windowsill  is fine.


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